This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
technology in action


since expanded to six major aerospace customers. Tuck estimated that the shop’s aerospace business has


grown 300% since 2008. That business includes subcontrac- tors to aerospace OEMs as well as privately-funded pro- ducers of space vehicles. Advanced Machining’s 12,000-ft2 (1116-m2


), state-of-the-art, climate-monitored facility today employs 25 people, and, in addition to aerospace work, the shop handles partmaking for customers in the energy, optics and high-tech markets. The ISO 9001:2008-certifi ed shop performs milling, turn- ing and electrical discharge machining (EDM), along with


impossible to produce without the simultaneous capability, Tuck said: “It allows us to do profi ling on turbines and work on extreme angles and curvatures.”


Powerful Positioning However, only some of the shop’s machine time is spent in the full simultaneous mode. The reason is that the rotary swiveling tables of the fi ve-axis machines provide the ability to position a part and machine it on fi ve sides in a single setup. Tuck gave the example of a part Advanced Machining quoted at $42 each, compared with the $200 each quoted by a shop that machined the original prototype. The competi- tor’s quote included labor for nine setups and four hours of time to complete each part. In comparison, fi ve-axis position- ing enabled Advanced Machining to complete the part in only two setups and produce four parts per hour. The fi ve-axis machines’ positioning capabilities and high- speed machining performance also permit effi cient removal of large volumes of material. In fact, the fi rst six weeks that Advanced Machining owned the HEM 500 machine, the shop recycled 3000 lb (1350 kg) of aluminum chips. “We had 110-lb, 20 × 20" [50-kg; 508 × 508-mm] alumi- num blocks that we were whittling down to about 9 lb [4 kg] or less,” Tuck explained, “We ordered the machine when we became aware that the work was on the way. We knew the fi rst jobs we got for it would be large chip generators.” Regarding such jobs, Tuck said, “We don’t want to do that all the time. There are a lot of times that we have a half-pound piece of material and just take away a couple of ounces. It depends on the prints and what the customer wants.”


A Five-Axis Mindset


Preparing a fi ve-axis milling operation at Advanced Machining.


comprehensive in-process and fi nal inspection processes. Typical lot sizes are one to 10 pieces, with occasional part runs of 1000 or more. Repeat orders are largely customer and market dependent. Optical components, for example, represent regularly repeating jobs, while parts for space vehicle contractors can be one of a kind. Turnaround time is routinely four weeks or less. Tuck said that as many as 10 of the shop’s 20 machine tools may be set up for new jobs twice a day, so on average, 10 or 15 completed jobs leave the shop daily. Simultaneous fi ve-axis machining plays a key role in fi ll- ing the needs of the shop’s aerospace industry customers. Some aerospace components would be very diffi cult or even


Extensive planning and training preceded the arrival of


fi ve-axis technology at Advanced Machining. The shop’s three-axis mills were fi tted with four- and fi ve-axis tables and used for training. Plus, when the shop took delivery of its fi rst fi ve-axis machine, a representative from GF Machining Solutions came out and spent a week introduc- ing the shop’s machinists to the technology and getting them familiar with its basics. The machinists then received another two weeks of advanced training after several months. According to Tuck, without that level of support, the shop would have had a tough time getting acclimated to the new technology.


The training at Advanced Machining was part of the GF Machining Solutions extensive operations, machine and business support for customers. The all-encompassing program spans from original spare parts, technical support


108 — Aerospace & Defense Manufacturing 2015


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232  |  Page 233  |  Page 234  |  Page 235  |  Page 236  |  Page 237  |  Page 238  |  Page 239  |  Page 240  |  Page 241  |  Page 242  |  Page 243  |  Page 244  |  Page 245  |  Page 246  |  Page 247  |  Page 248  |  Page 249  |  Page 250  |  Page 251  |  Page 252  |  Page 253  |  Page 254  |  Page 255  |  Page 256  |  Page 257  |  Page 258  |  Page 259  |  Page 260  |  Page 261  |  Page 262  |  Page 263  |  Page 264  |  Page 265  |  Page 266  |  Page 267  |  Page 268  |  Page 269  |  Page 270  |  Page 271  |  Page 272  |  Page 273  |  Page 274  |  Page 275  |  Page 276  |  Page 277  |  Page 278  |  Page 279  |  Page 280  |  Page 281  |  Page 282  |  Page 283  |  Page 284  |  Page 285  |  Page 286  |  Page 287  |  Page 288  |  Page 289  |  Page 290  |  Page 291  |  Page 292  |  Page 293  |  Page 294  |  Page 295  |  Page 296  |  Page 297  |  Page 298  |  Page 299  |  Page 300  |  Page 301  |  Page 302  |  Page 303  |  Page 304  |  Page 305  |  Page 306  |  Page 307  |  Page 308  |  Page 309  |  Page 310  |  Page 311  |  Page 312