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league structure for the future. Now, as coach of a successful Division II program, he’s watching as the sport continues to sprout in his state, which now features approximately 500 youth boys’ teams.


“Lacrosse is growing like wildfire,” he said.


Members of the Utah Lacrosse Association staff have attended the US Lacrosse Convention each of the last two years, and many, including former Westminster player Colin Madsen, were impressed by the recent Lacrosse Athlete Development Model presentation by T.J. Buchanan, US Lacrosse’s technical director for athlete development.


Madsen and fellow coaches and administrators were inspired to implement LADM into leagues as soon as they could. In a state where programs sometimes struggle to find the number of players to play a full a 10v10 league, the model’s small-sided elements provided an easier way to get children involved. “Since that point on, I started spreading the word about it,” said Madsen, who now serves as ULA’s boys’ program coordinator. “I looked at it more from a logistical standpoint. Now that we’re cutting the game down, it’s like we have so many more teams, which means less travel and more scheduling options.”


LOCALLY GROWN ARIZONA


The chapter is excited to support the growth of the sport alongside the new Arizona State women’s lacrosse team that debuts in 2018.


COLORADO


The annual Denver City Lax Mile High Gala drew more than 400 attendees, including representatives of MLL’s Outlaws and the NLL’s Mammoth, in support of urban lacrosse initiatives.


GREATER LA


Kids in Sports, a US Lacrosse Diversity and Inclusion Grant recipient, has assembled a program in Loma Alta Park. Gabriel Fowler, a 14U coach, earned a scholarship to attend the US Lacrosse Convention in January.


HAWAII


Hawaii Youth Lacrosse will host a free Sankofa Lacrosse clinic July 10-12 in Honolulu for boys and girls from underrepresented communities.


USlaxmagazine.com UTAH


Utah could be considered a model of CDP localization. Westminster coach Mason Goodhand is a long-time CDP trainer and local coordinator.


May/June 2017 US LACROSSE MAGAZINE 33 SAN DIEGO


San Diego-based Wheelchair Lacrosse USA continues to grow. Founded by two non- lacrosse players, the sport has brought them and countless others the opportunity to be active, competitive and part of a team.


NEVADA


The Nevada Women’s Lacrosse Association, Silver State Lacrosse and the Southern Nevada Lacrosse Association have unified as the SNLA to align and accelerate the sport’s growth in the local community.


ORANGE COUNTY


The annual Pacific Coast Shootout featured an OT thriller March 11 between Virginia and Cornell, with an announced 6,000 fans in attendance.


“Colin has totally bought into what we’re doing,” Buchanan said. “He’s doing a great job of telling everybody in the area about it.” Goodhand is already a certified Coach Development Program trainer, and Madsen is currently training to become the same. Goodhand is leading the charge to get coaches around the state Level 1-certified.


Madsen, like Goodhand, believes that as more first-generation Utah lacrosse players become parents and coaches, the quality of the game will increase. That process should play out over the next decade. In addition, both said the potential addition of a Division I program at Utah could generate more interest. “We’re on the cusp of a couple


very significant breakthroughs,” Goodhand said. USL

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