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FUEL INSPIRATION


KID INNOVATORS


Young entrepreneurs Will Dadouris and Samantha Wolfe have caught the attention of the lacrosse


industry BY MATT HAMILTON AND MEGAN SCHNEIDER


Next on “Shark Tank?” High school seniors Will Dadouris (Gill St. Bernard’s, N.J.) and Samatha Wolfe (Chappaqua, N.Y.) started their own lacrosse companies to meet different needs. Dadouris, founder of the non-profi t ReLax Collections, found joy in bringing the sport to an impoverished community in Jamaica during a Fields of Growth mission. What started as a driveway full of pads and sticks has turned into nearly $200,000 in lacrosse equipment Dadouris has collected and redistributed in fi ve countries. “Seeing how everyone can unite around a lacrosse stick,


that’s why we do it,” said Dadouris, who started the venture when he was 13. Wolfe, who invented a heated women’s lacrosse stick, wanted to warm up freezing hands across the country. She came up with the idea when she was 11, made her father a business partner and earlier this year launched a prototype of the FingerFire. It features a USB port in the butt of the shaft that allows players to warm it up to 70 degrees, lasting up to two hours.


“I like a handle that can warm your hands in the cold,” said Syracuse coach Gary Gait, to whom Wolfe hand-delivered a prototype. “If the right product is developed, it could catch on.” USL


26 US LACROSSE MAGAZINE May/June 2017 USlacrosse.org


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