search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
 


  US LACROSSE WESTERN MID-ATLANTIC REGION


EARLY ADOPTERS The Lacrosse Athlete Development Model is spreading like wildfire in


central Pennsylvania BY BRIAN LOGUE


The transformation of youth lacrosse in central Pennsylvania isn’t hard to see. “Two years ago, we had 8- and 9-year olds putting on gear they had never worn before, trying to manipulate a stick they had never held before, and doing it on a full-sized fi eld with all of the other things involved — man-up, man-down, riding and clearing,” said Jeremy Adams, the head boys’ lacrosse coach at Hempfi eld High School near Lancaster, Pa., and an advisor to the Lancaster-Lebanon Youth Boys’ Lacrosse League. Today, the area is one of the fastest-adopting areas of the Lacrosse Athlete Development Model (LADM). Katie Bergey, the director of the Cumberland Valley (Pa.) girls’ youth program, says that close to 100 teams competing in the Mid- Penn League and Lancaster-Lebanon League will be infl uenced by LADM guidelines this season. “We’re in a newer area, but it’s exciting to be at the forefront of what lacrosse is going to be,” said Bergey, who coaches both boys’ and girls’ youth lacrosse teams. “People are more willing to listen to the data and research.” One of the biggest benefi ts to the LADM is the potential for growth. Small-sided games require fewer players, less equipment at the youngest levels and thus lower costs for people just trying it out.


My USL Rep Mark Eissele Western Mid-Atlantic


Mark Eissele joined US Lacrosse in August 2014 and oversees development and growth efforts in the Western Mid-Atlantic Region, including parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West


Virginia, and Virginia. Mark’s US Lacrosse experience started many years earlier, when his kids began playing and he found himself coaching. He took advantage of the Coach Development Program to become a certifi ed coach in both games. Now his kids both play in high school, so he can be found in the stands cheering or trying to keep up as he plays for two “old-man” club teams.


How can US Lacrosse help develop the sport in your area, contact Mark at meissele@ uslacrosse.org or 410-235-6882, extension 169.


32 US LACROSSE MAGAZINE May/June 2017


PICTURE THIS STICK SPRINGERS


Highland Springs High School, a 2016 US Lacrosse First Stick Grant recipient from Richmond, Va., held an indoor practice to get ready for the spring season.


USlacrosse.org

Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82