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Future Jumps Te rapid prototyping and short


volume niche has been an important one for the iron casting facility. It protected the company from a signifi- cant downturn during the recession— sales were down just 6%—and it came back quickly as growth has contin- ued. According to Savard, Saguenay Foundry has grown in sales by 25% in the last two to three years. “We are innovative and want to make solid and steady growth and keep our relationships with customers for a long time,” Savard said. “We like to choose good customers and take care of them.” In 2010, 3-D technology was


used for zero of Saguenay Foundry’s operations. Now it accounts for 25% of business. But the company doesn’t want to be caught doing only one or


two parts at a time. It needs a certain volume to continue. “Seventy-five percent of our production goes to legacy or production parts,” Savard said. “We can’t have a foundry this size without that. We want to grow more in that area, as well.” When a big piece of machinery, such


as one used in an aluminum smelter, goes down from a worn-out casting, the quick replacement of that part is critical. Tese legacy parts are where Saguenay Foundry sees itself as a top-tier sup- plier. “We can turn around castings in a week,” Savard said. “If a customer’s machine breaks down, we can handle those emergencies.” Not all of its production volume


customers have a need for Saguenay Foundry’s 3-D technologies, but it works to attract new custom- ers and serve as an indication that


the company is progressive and forward-thinking. “Our customers are really aware of


these technologies and most of them are savvy,” Rouleau said. “Te smaller corporations, who are also good customers, might require more of a teaching moment, but they see what it means for them on the engineering and economic side.” Savard hopes the company’s


innovative mentality goes on. Te company has been keeping an eye on how the printing technology has evolved over the last few years. Because Saguenay Foundry pro- duces large parts, the machinery has not been economical. But that could be changing as printers get bigger. “We try to stay on the cutting edge


of technology,” Savard said. “We do a lot of technology watching.”


A new automated CNC center was installed last year for machining foam patterns. 22 | MODERN CASTING September 2016


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