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Honorable Mention Steel Plunger Tip Signicast Investment Castings, Hartford, Wisconsin


Material: 4150 steel. Process: Investment casting. Weight: 6.5 lbs. Dimensions: 4 in. long, 3.28 in. diameter.. Converted From: Cold chamber shot end plunger tip.


• Converted from a fully machined solid billet component, the investment casting solution allowed the customer to free up valuable machine capacity to be used for other applications. Through the conversion, the customer realized cost reduc- tions of at least 22% over the machined billet configuration.


• The part was designed to incorporate spanner wrench slots along with as-cast wrench flats. The casting provided the customer the ability to add as-cast heat transfer features, which were not possible with machining from solid.


• The cooling internal passage includes an internal turbine- style directional cooling flow feature at the leading molten metal contact end. It also includes rib features along the inner diameter for improved heat transfer along the inner side walls.


Honorable Mention


Differential Case Waupaca Foundry Plant 4, Marinette, Wisconsin


Material: Ductile iron. Process: Green sand casting. Weight: 13.5 lbs. Dimensions: 7.5 x 9.75 x 9.75 in. Converted From: Driveline for automotive-light truck.


• The customer wanted an optimized helical advanced differential case designed in a short timeframe. Normally a core would be used to cast the desired internal features, but the customer wanted win- dows in the side of the casting for oil flow, which would have been cost prohibitive.


• Through collaboration, Waupaca and the customer moved parting lines, changed surface draft and altered machined stock to incorpo- rate a wraparound core that reduced the weight of the casting and minimized the amount of material to be machined off.


• Computer modeling and communication between Waupaca and the customer resulted in a more robust design that eliminated porosity in some areas and repositioned porosity in other areas so it was removed during machining or placed in safe locations. The iterative casting design also lowered machining cycle time, further reducing total manufacturing cost for our customer.


26 | MODERN CASTING April 2015


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