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IN A WORLD WITHOUT CASTINGS


Would England’s Conservatories Be Architectural Marvels?


Tough in use since the late 18th


century, cast iron architecture reached new levels of beauty and scope in the 1840s, when many of England’s most iconic conservatories were built. But none could compare with the Crystal Palace (left), which was built for the Great Exhibition of 1851. Te gigantic structure dwarfed


its predecessors, stretching 1,851 ft. (564 m) long with an interior height of 128 ft. (39 m). Te Crystal Palace featured 3,300 cast iron columns, 2,150 iron girders and more than 290,000 panes of glass. While the structure was destroyed by fire in 1936, a number of England’s finest cast iron conservato- ries, such as the Palm House at Kew Gardens (below), still stand today.


April 2015 MODERN CASTING | 19


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