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Honda unveiled the relaunch of its Acura NSX at the North American International Auto Show in January.


Honda worked with Alotech to design and produce ablation cast nodes or joints for the Acura NSX’s super frame.


car, which originally debuted 25 years ago, it put an R&D team in charge of its development and announced global production would be in the U.S. T e carmaker wanted to push itself to use advanced materials and processes in building the supercar. After three years of design, the production version of the NSX was unveiled this January, featuring a space-frame body built


W


hen Honda decided to relaunch a new generation of its Acura NSX sports-


with advanced materials and pro- cesses—some for the fi rst time in pro- duction. Key to the space frame were three cast aluminum connecting joints produced by Honda via the ground- breaking ablation casting process. “Just like the original, which was


the fi rst all-aluminum production car, the new NSX will feature ‘world’s-fi rst materials’ and innovative construction,” said Ted Klaus, Chief Engineer and Global Development Leader, NSX, at the North American International Auto Show in January. “A multi-mate-


rial chassis comprised of an aluminum intensive space frame, with strategic use of ultra-high-strength steel, carbon fi ber and all-aluminum suspension.” T e space-frame concept primarily


utilizes extruded aluminum lengths and cast aluminum nodes serving as joints. In the early design stages, Honda engineers had small cast aluminum joints in the space frame but outside of the crash zones. T ey saw an opportunity for additional part consolidation and space frame performance if they could design the


April 2015 MODERN CASTING | 21


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