This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Best-In-Class


Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle Front Kick Down Rail Magna International, Troy, Michigan.


Material: Aluminum Aural 5S-T5 temper. Process: High pressure vacuum diecasting. Weight: 2.63 lbs. (1.195 kg). Dimensions: 16.4 x 25.9 x 27.8 in. (417


mm x 658 mm x 707 mm). Application: Structural automotive body component.


• The kick down rail is one of several structural cast compo- nents being developed through the Multi Materials Light- weight Vehicle (MMLV) Project launched in 2012 among Magna International, the U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Co.


• Cast in alumiumum Aural 52, the diec asting integrates five steel stampings and is about 25% lighter. It lowers the weight from the base line vehicle from 1.6 to 1.2 kg per side.


• The structural casting acts as chassis reinforcement for the front structure and adds stiffness, torque load capacity and torsional rigidity to the MMLV body structure.


Best-In-Class Stalk Roll


Grede-Columbiana, Columbiana, Alabama


Material: Ductile iron 80-55-06. Process: Lost foam casting. Weight: 23 lbs. Dimensions: 22.6 x 4.6 in. (575 x 118 mm). Application: Assist in the separation and processing of corn stalk mate- rial during harvest.


• By utilizing the lost foam casting process, the stalk roll was able to be designed with thin walls, insets and complex geometry which led to the weight reduc- tion of about 1 lb.


• Holes in the casting were made without cores at no additional cost by adding a pin in the tool cavity for the foam pattern.


• The reduction of metal in the casting and material to be removed during machining resulted in overall cost savings. Due to the tooling complexity and flexibility of adding back-drafted features and removing mate- rial, the stalk roll’s shape is symmetrical.


April 2015 MODERN CASTING | 25


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60