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Table 2. Aluminum Association Standard Chemical Composition Limits for 356 Aluminum Alloy AA # Product


Si 356.0 S&P remainder 6.5-7.5 Fe 0.6


0.13- 0.25


0.15 Cu 0.25


356.1 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5 0.50 0.25 356.2 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5


0.10


A356.0 S&P remainder 6.5-7.5 0.20 0.20 A356.1 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5 A356.2 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5 B356.0 S&P remainder 6.5-7.5 B356.2 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5 C356.0 S&P remainder 6.5-7.5 C356.2 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5


0.20


0.12 0.10 0.09 0.05 0.06 0.03 0.07 0.05 0.04 0.03


F356.0 S&P remainder 6.5-7.5 0.20 0.20 F356.2 Ingot remainder 6.5-7.5


0.12 0.10


Mn Mg 0.35 0.35 0.05 0.10 0.10 0.05 0.05 0.03 0.05 0.03 0.10 0.05


Zn 0.20-0.45 0.35


Ti 0.25


0.25-0.45 0.35 0.25 0.30-0.45 0.05 0.20 0.25-0.45 0.10 0.20 0.30-0.45 0.10 0.20 0.30-0.45 0.05 0.20


0.25-0.45 0.05 0.04-0.20 0.30-0.45 0.03 0.04-0.20 0.25-0.45 0.05 0.04-0.20 0.30-0.45 0.03 0.04-0.20 0.17-0.25 0.17-0.25


0.10 0.05


0.04-0.20 0.04-0.20


Others Each Total 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.15 0.10 0.15 0.10 0.15 0.15


0.05 0.05


0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.03 0.05 0.03 0.05 0.05


content, A206 exhibits only fair resistance to hot tearing and a greater tendency to solidifi cation shrinkage. T is alloy will require gating and rigging techniques that will provide steep thermal gradients. Close control of chemistry melt temperature and other melting process parameters is important. Grain refi ning is especially helpful. T e alloy is very sensitive to contamination and small amounts of silicon will severely reduce properties. Machinability—T is alloy has


excellent machining characteristics. Moderate to fast speeds and feeds will provide best results. Finishing—Electroplated fi nishes


are excellent on this alloy. It can be pol- ished and anodized with good results. Weldability—It has fair to good


welding characteristics. However, take caution during welding to control temperature to prevent cracking due to heat induced stresses. Corrosion Resistance—T e resis- tance of these alloys to most forms of common corrosion is fair and compa- rable to other aluminum alloys with similar copper levels.


Alloys 319.0, A319.0, B319.0 and 320.0


Alloys 319.0 and A319.0 exhibit


good castability, weldability, pressure tightness and moderate strength and are stable in that their casting and mechanical properties are not affected by fluctuations in impurity contents. Alloys B319.0 and 320.0 show higher strength and hardness


than 319.0 and A319.0 and gener- ally are used with the permanent mold casting process. Characteristics other than strength and hardness are similar to those of 319.0. Typical applications for sand cast- ings of these alloys include internal combustion and diesel engine crank- cases, gasoline and oil tanks, and oil pans. Permanent mold cast components include water-cooled cylinder heads, rear axle housings and engine parts. Castability—T ese alloys all exhibit


good pressure tightness, fl uidity, and resistance to hot cracking and solidifi - cation shrinkage tendencies. Machinability—Machining charac-


teristics are good. To preclude pos- sible adverse eff ects of abrasives and inclusions, carbide-tipped tools are recommended. Finishing—Electroplated fi nishes


are good on these alloys. Mechanical and anodized fi nishes are fair. Weldability—Arc welding results in the most satisfactory welds. Resistance


This rear lower control arm for the automotive industry was cast hollow in A356 aluminum alloy using the low-pressure permanent mold casting process.


Jul/Aug 2016 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | 43


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