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threads. T e team also looked at trans- formative and potentially disruptive approaches to how cast metal compo- nents are produced. Eight categories for new technologies and processes


needed for metalcasting were outlined: • Additive manufacturing and rapid subtractive manufacturing.


• Lightweighting. • Smart machines and manufacturing. • Digital thread integration and implementation.


• Automation, robotics, ergonom- ics, and sustainability.


• Melt-pour-cast. • Advanced metalcasting technology. • Quality.


Within each category, areas for


improvement were identifi ed with pro- jected timelines of how long it should take to achieve target outcomes (see charts on pg. 37-39). Advancements in process will deliver on the whole shorter lead times, more effi cient designs, better performance, and im- proved profi tability.


Materials Material research and development


can improve quality, performance and cost-eff ectiveness and reduce weight and lead times, according to the roadmap. T e three major materials categories of focus for the metalcasting


38 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | Jul/Aug 2016


industry in the next 10 years are: • Cast materials, including the


• Mold, die and tooling materi- als, covering expendable cores, coatings and lubricants, binders, reclamation, alternative wax ma- terials, and additive manufactur- ing materials properties. • Furnace refractories.


Design Increasing the tools for design


is a critical element in moving the


optimization of properties, enhanced alloys, sustainable substitutes and hybrids (see chart on pg. 40).


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