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looking to stand out. T at, however, might be the secondary benefi t to the masks.


Changing the Game? Cast stainless steel is ductile, and when not heat-treated it is still tough. To demonstrate that, Singer


said he’s pulled the masks apart and pushed them together, bend- ing and flexing them to show their toughness. They don’t snap and shatter


An image for the “Brickhouse” model is shown. This is one of the masks that have been certi- fi ed by the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE).


and, most crucially, Pizzuti and Singer say they dissipate energy more efficiently than the tra- ditional welded mask, and this could lower concussions and make football safer. “As we started to talk about


this project we theorized that one singular piece of steel would ab- sorb energy better than multiple pieces that were welded together,” Pizzuti said. Singer said that as the energy


goes through all of the individual elements of the mask, it will hit an intersection that slows it down and splits it. So by the time that energy gets to the helmet, Singer said, its impact is less because it’s taken more time to reach the head of the wearer. “We believe that’s happening


because if you were to lay it out fl at it’s all one plane and then it’s curved like wrapping it around a soccer ball,” Singer said. “Whereas the wire masks, if you were to lay it fl at and lay it down on a fl at table you would see some wires are touching the ta- ble and then other wires are stacked on top of it. T at energy is not being transferred to those other elements. It’s bypassing those intersections and going more directly straighter and faster to the helmet, and therefore faster to the head of the wearer.” During standard drop testing, the masks were dropped fi ve times from a height of 12-15 ft. and, in Pizzuti’s words, they wanted to “beat the snot out of them.”


24 | METAL CASTING DESIGN & PURCHASING | Jul/Aug 2016


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