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® MEMORY CARE


Integrated Care. Better Outcomes.


Senior Living Executive magazine recognizes MatrixCare for its generous support and thought leadership of Argentum’s 2016 memory care programming.


Pushing the Boundaries of Memory Care and Cure


By Mollie Bloudoff-Indelicato M


edical professionals and commu- nity leaders came together for a symposium hosted by Argentum


on Alzheimer’s and dementia care and cure in Washington, D.C., this fall. The member-only event, Memory Care


Symposium: Innovations from Care to Cure focused on how forward-thinkers can facil- itate real change within their organizations and communities to better support people with Alzheimer’s disease and their families. Alzheimer’s affects about 5 million Ameri- cans. In just a few decades, this number is projected to increase to 14 million, accord- ing to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While there is no cure, research- ers and community organizers are making progress on how best to serve this popula- tion and reduce the stigma surrounding it. “Try to see the person who is there and not


just the person who is not there, acknowledg- ing that that person is crucially important,” says Dr. Joshua Wiener, a distinguished fellow at nonprofit research firm RTI International.


Dr. Marie Bernard, the deputy director of the National Institute on Aging.


A Better Future for Alzheimer’s Care Wiener is one of the experts working toward a better future for Alzheimer’s care. At the symposium, sponsored by MatrixCare and held at the National Press Club, Wiener outlined his work supporting people ex- periencing Alzheimer’s. Wiener’s team analyzed and documented dozens of key challenges that make patient care difficult and condensed those concerns into just 14 clear categories. By focusing on each of the categories respectively, senior living communities can use this information to, for example, make the transition from home to assisted living as smooth and comfortable as possible. Once individuals are situated in their surroundings—be it at home or in a senior


50 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016


living community—it’s imperative that their quality of life improves. And for Dr. John Zeisel, the president of Hearthstone Alzheimer Care, engagement is the key to a content and happy life. If you are en- gaged in something that is meaningful to you, he says, you can’t be anxious, agitated, aggressive or apathetic—all symptoms of Alzheimer’s. Zeisel spoke about the wis- dom of engaging people with Alzheimer’s in activities that don’t require complicated thoughts or actions. “Creative and artistic expression [is im-


portant for people with Alzheimer’s],” he says. “You don’t have to tell a baby [who also doesn’t have fine motor skills] when the mu- sic is playing to move around, they just do.” With many types of dementia, people lose


their social groups, decision-making power and opportunities to learn. So Zeisel says educators and community leaders need to


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