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CEDARBROOK OF BLOOMFIELD HILLS Bloomfield Hills, Michigan Provider: Cedarbrook Senior Living Architect: Progressive Associates & Fusco Shaffer & Pappas


Cedarbrook of Bloomfield Hills, which opened in December 2015, offers 142 apart- ments, designed around common spaces that allow for informal and formal gather- ings. This 200,000-square-foot continuing care retirement community offers 36 inde- pendent living apartments, 50 assisted liv- ing, 36 memory care and 20 skilled nursing. “We started with a site with significant


topographic challenges and from it we de- veloped a unique and creative design that allows the building to function as a commu- nity, yet provide residents with privacy and personal spaces specific to their needs,” said Michael J. Damone, president, Cedarbrook Senior Living. The community is set on a seven-and-a-half acre site that slopes 60


10 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE / NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2016


feet from the west to the east end, he said. The challenge, Damone noted, was coming up with a structure that would be efficient and meet the needs of the residents. One common floor connects the parking deck for the independent living apartments, the com- mon area, and assisted living apartments. The topography challenge worked to the


site’s advantage, noted Senior Living by De- sign judge Larry Bongort, senior healthcare architect, Stantec Architecture. “The slop- ing site is used to good advantage to seam- lessly integrate the resident clusters and the support spaces,” he added. Despite the chal- lenges, the result is a well-done site, added Senior Living by Design judge John Cronin, principal at AG Architecture.


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