search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
2020 ARGENTUM AWARDS


HERO AWARD Angela Mastrella Program Director, Avita of Wells Northbridge Companies


BUILDING A PATHWAY ACROSS THE YEARS


Parents of toddlers are familiar with taking them to music or art classes—where children bang on drums, learn songs, smear paint around, dance waving scarves, practice sharing—and have found the experience adorable, hilarious, and heart- warming. Those in memory care feel the same. Why not bring them all together? “When we create these intergenerational programs, these barriers break down, and then connections are made organ- ically that are just absolutely amazing to witness,” says Ange- la Mastrella, program director at Avita of Wells Memory Care, whose nominator calls her a “fierce advocate for her residents.” “She prides herself on ensuring that those living with de- mentia have a true sense of purpose.” “You see the flooding of memories of raising their own chil-


dren,” Mastrella says, “which almost 100 percent of the time is what they remember or enjoyed most about their lives.” Many of the interactions grow into friendships, such as the one between Stanley, 95, and Etta, 3, which was covered by Good Morning America. Etta and her mom visit Stanley, bring treats, and play the Candyland board game—pretty much a 3-year-old’s perfect day.


All ages included


The intergenerational bridges at Avita of Wells don’t stop with toddlers. Elementary students have a “senior buddy” to talk to and play games with. The nearby junior high has a “lunch bunch,” where students serve lunch to residents, which grew into one-on-one visits of listening to music together and help- ing with technology. The high schoolers can learn about se- nior living careers or get volunteer practicum experience. In fact, the walk between the community and the nearby school has been named the “Pathway to Generations.” The programs grew organically, too. The junior high program evolved and the school got wind of the success of it. More parents were saying, I want my child to be involved in that.”


Photo taken before COVID-19.


“There are so many ways to have these moments of great joy, if you just think outside the box.”


Though she started several intergenerational programs, Mastrella says, “it's not always me reaching out. Sometimes it's the teachers reaching out and saying, Hey, could this hap- pen? And I always think of a way to say, yes, it can. I never close the door to an opportunity.” Part of her own purpose is to end stereotypes about who people living with dementia are and what they can do. “There are so many ways to have these moments of great joy, if you just think outside the box. You may have to modify and assist, but there are ways to make it happen.” Assisted living became a more understanding, compassionate and kind world because of Angela,” her nomination says. “There is no mistaking that this was what she was meant to do.”


THANKS TO 2020 ARGENTUM HERO AWARDS SPONSOR JULY/AUGUST 2020 ARGENTUM.ORG 29


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60