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NAVIGATING NEW DISTANCES


Skills Transferability: A Narrow Gap to Bridge


Senior living is well placed to recruit and onboard workers displaced during the COVID-19 slowdown. Hospitality, retail, and restaurant workers, who have been furloughed and laid-off in large numbers, have many skills and competencies in demand within senior living occupations. These two examples show the value of skills in occupations.


Cashiers and waitstaff have more than a 90 percent skill match with personal care aides and nursing assistants. The largest skill


gap is for “service orientation,” which is typically learned on the job. Also of interest: This source of labor may earn lower wages on average than entry-level senior living occupations. The skills set here comes from the Occupational Information


Network, or O*NET Program, a free database of almost 1,000 occupations covering the U.S. economy, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor. Specific skills and training would still be needed, but less than for many other occupations.


From Cashier to Personal Care Aide Median Hourly Wage: $10.78 vs. $11.53


Service Orientation Social Perceptiveness Monitoring


Critical Thinking Active Listening


0 10 Cashier 20 30 Personal Care Aide 40 50 60


Waiter/Waitress to Nursing Assistant Median Hourly Wage: $10.47 vs. $13.70


Service Orientation Speaking


Social Perceptiveness Reading Comprehension Monitoring


0 10 20 Waiter/Waitress 30 Nursing Assistant Sources: Emsi Job Posting Analytics JULY/AUGUST 2020 ARGENTUM.ORG 13 40 50 60


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