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Murano: by Suzanne Conway A


Murano | © Dmitry Chulov/Bigstock


short vaporetto (water bus) ride away from Venice proper lies the grittier, industrial, bridge-linked islands that make up Murano, world-famous for its hand-blown glass.


Murano became the glassmaking capital when the


Venetian Republic, fearing fire and destruction of the city’s mostly wooden buildings, ordered glass- makers to move their foundries to Murano in 1291. Centuries later, the fascinating art form is still go- ing strong. Visitors flock here every year to watch artisans practice their craft and peruse the shops filled with glass pieces, from chande- liers and table lamps to bowls and vases. A stop at the Museo del Vetro is well worth


The Barovier Cup © Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia


a visit to explore the history and intricacy of Murano glass. Located in the ancient Palazzo Giustinian, it was once the residence of the Torcello bishops. Te collec- tion is laid out chronologically, starting from the archae- ological section to contemporary glass. Color-themed rooms display collections of Murano glassworks, in- cluding Venetian beads, mirrors, and other glass creations. Be sure to find the famous Barovier Cup, designed by Angelo Barovier as a wedding gift between 1470 and 1480.


Zanfirico Glasses | ©Ars Cenedese Murano 22 | | Fall 2015 | www.perillotraveler.com Murano glass artworks on display. | ©Cebas Murano/Bigstock


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