This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Image credit here


By the Numbers FUN FACTS & FIGURES


6


New Recruits University and college seniors are months away from graduating and entering the workforce. How grads have been wooed by employers through the years:


by Steve Brearton


Jobs found in 1985 by philosophy students at the University of Toronto following a teacher-paid junket to Washington, DC. “We’ll rent an apartment in a hotel near the philosophy conference, stock it with booze and work like mad to get our grads jobs,” said the department’s chair at the time


68 | CPA MAGAZINE | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


15 Percent of US-based companies among


employers attending Wilfrid Laurier University’s two job fairs during the 2000/2001 school year. Three years earlier, US attendance was “negligible”


20 Dollars University of Toronto engineering


students each paid in 1986 to hire a marketer to promote them to corporate Canada.


“We got fed up with engineering grads from the University of Waterloo always getting more jobs,” one student said


25 University events scheduled in September


2006 by one Canadian high-tech employer.


“If you’re not there in September you run the risk of missing out on some of the top talent,” said one recruiter. “You can’t waste a minute”


50+ Buses hired by Northern Telecom to transport


about 1,000 handpicked graduating students to an all-expenses-paid job fair in Ottawa in 1997. The company spent more than $500,000


200 University of Alberta commerce grads “wined


and dined” in 1981 by about 120 businesses. Most firms go to campuses in the fall and hire by mid-January


2001 Year KPMG started its campus ambassador


program in Canada to recruit gen-Y employees. Students return to campus with branded knapsacks, coffee mugs and more for fellow seniors


Up to 10,000 Dollars paid to attend campus job fairs by


Internet service provider UUNET in 2001. The firm also hired a plane to fly over Toronto with a banner reading “Cool jobs at UUNET.ca


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72