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Workplace MANAGEMENT AND THE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT BUSINESS ETIQUETTE


Q: My colleagues hover when I’m on the phone. Am I supposed to hang


up every time they’re around?


A: IN AN OPEN-CONCEPT OFFICE you’re almost guaranteed to face this workplace staple — the guys or gals who loiter at your cubicle when you’re on a call. They lean on the wall of your pod, staring at you until you hang up or acknowledge their presence. While these folks might do well to consider steering clear of your space until you’re free, there are a few etiquette rules that apply to you too. It’s sometimes difficult to avoid calls from your spouse, the kids or your mother (who knows you’re at work but just has to speak with you), but keep personal tittle-tattle to a minimum. “If you’re having a confidential conversation, take your cell outside for a chat. You’ll likely not get any uncomfortable lingerers to contend with,” says Karen Cleveland, an etiquette expert in Toronto. “If you find yourself with a manager who needs you to wrap up a call, tell the person you’re on the line with that you’ll ring him or her back shortly and give your boss your undivided attention.” If you’re on with an important client, ask him or her to hold for a moment, let your manager know whom you’re speaking with and find out if he or she can hang tight until you’re off. — Lisa van de Geyn


PROFILE THE TALENTED MR. MOORE


He’s not even 40 and MATTHEW MOORE already has three degrees, his CPA and three management titles under his belt. The co-owner and director of Oceanstone Seaside Resort in Indian Harbour, NS, Moore also manages a luxury villa rental in Barbados and is cofounder and director of Moore Executive Suites/Moore Student Living Canada. His entrepre- neurial path started with a moving company — just him and a pickup truck — when he was 17. “I wanted to do my own thing and it was better money-wise to run a business,” he says. His career has only picked up speed. These days he wears many hats, “and they’re not all fun,” he admits. “But I enjoy the chal- lenge.” He says his CPA still comes in handy for everything from strategy implementation and project management to decision-making and critical thinking. “It’s not just a normal nine-to-five. But by doing something I’m passionate about, it’s not as much like work.” — Martha Beach


14 | CPA MAGAZINE | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


Illustration: Maurice Vellekoop


Nance Ackerman/KlixPix


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