This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Workplace


Knowing When to Say


No You’re doing yourself a disservice if you can’t drop the word “yes” from your vocabulary. Here’s why


YOU’RE AN ACCOUNTANT at a midsized firm. A colleague, we’ll call him Ken, walks into your office, cursing under his breath. He sits down and starts rattling off his long list of to-dos for the day — back-to-back off-site meetings with clients, assisting on an audit, a business lunch and a confer- ence call. You commiserate for a few minutes — your day also looks pretty packed — then suggest you two take a load off aſter work; you’ll buy him a beer at the pub down the street. He nods,


16 | CPA MAGAZINE | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016


stands up and starts toward the door, but before you can avert your eyes back to your growing number of unread emails, he says, “Actually, there’s something I wanted to ask you.” You swivel your chair back toward him. “I’m meeting with a potential client tomorrow and haven’t had time to review the file. I’m obviously too busy to do it today. Will you check it out for me? I’ll owe you one.” Here’s the dilemma: you’re up to your


eyeballs in work, including a new assign- ment the boss handed you yesterday. If you’re going to get ahead of your respon- sibilities to avoid working all weekend, you don’t see how you can fit Ken’s new client analysis into the mix. But, Ken is obviously treading water and needs you to throw him a lifeline — maybe he’s having problems at home that are taking his attention away from his work at the office, or maybe an overly needy client is


monopolizing his time and he’s gotten behind. Ken is a coworker and a good guy and you don’t want to leave him hanging out to dry, but there’s already too much on your plate. So what do you do? Agree to help out


and put yourself in a pickle, or utter that dreaded two-letter word and risk disap- pointing a colleague? There are plenty of reasons why so


many of us have a hard time saying no. First off, a yes is hands down a more attractive option because it’s just, well, much easier — yes doesn’t demand an explanation the way no does. Eileen Chadnick, a work-life/leadership coach and principal of Big Cheese Coaching in Toronto, says saying yes is a reflex, espe- cially for folks “addicted to the yes habit. They don’t have the confidence to assert and say no; they haven’t clarified their boundaries and priorities to themselves;


Susanna Denti


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72