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Basic Aviation Training Device (BATD) is the lowest level of simulation and must recreate the appearance, arrangement, operation, and function of basic systems. Ten loggable hours with an instructor present in these devices may be applied towards an instrument rating and IFR proficiency.


Advanced Aviation Training Device (AATD) is first required to meet


or exceed BATD approval


requirements. An AATD must also display sufficient aircraft cockpit design,


ergonomic features, AFS-205 National Simulator Program (NSP)


AFS-205 is generally responsible for the airline world. However, helicopter activity and aircraft have approached the most sophisticated transport category airplanes in complexity. Thus, helicopter flight training organizations use both full flight simulators and flight training devices. This program is governed by 14 CFR, Part 60.


Full Flight Simulator (FFS): Levels A - D • Level B is the lowest level of helicopter simulation.


• Level C has an outside horizontal field of view of at least 75 degrees for each pilot.


• Level D outside horizontal field of view is at least 150 degrees, sounds in cockpit, etc.


Flight Training Device (FTD): Levels 5 - 7 (most sophisticated) • Evaluated annually by NSP (ASO-205). • Statement of Qualification valid for 12months.


• Approval: Training Program Approval Authority (TPAA) and flight school/syllabus. AFS-810 General Aviation and Commercial Division


AFS-810 is responsible for the development, program requirements, technical guidance, policies, standards, and approvals for aviation training devices used to satisfy pilot experience and training requirements under 14 CFR, Parts 61 and 141.


64 Jan/Feb 2017


and performance characteristics better than those required for BATDs. Additional elements over those required for BATDs include: shrouded cockpit, cockpit knobs, system controls, and switches/ switch panels in realistic sizes and design appropriate for each intended function. Up to 20 loggable hours may be applied towards an instrument rating under Part 61, while Part 141


school usage is generally negotiated between the school and FAA inspector, and heavily influenced by how the school implements the device into its syllabus.


Total Immersion Training


Total immersion is a relatively new term, but not a new idea. This type of training can be defined as focused training that reduces distractions, thus allowing for total focus on training objectives. This is accomplished with a flight training environment that completely shuts out the outside world. Once in the simulator, for all intents and purposes participants are sitting in the aircraft.


Faithful representation of the aircraft is the most important factor for achieving total immersion. The primary driving force to improved realism is new technology, particularly technology that impacts simulator visuals, accurate aircraft flight modeling, spot-on systems replication, motion cueing, and vibration.


Visual Systems


The tremendous improvements in simulator visuals can actually be attributed to the gaming industry. Many years ago someone came up with the idea of using the Microsoft Flight Simulator game as a graphics engine for flight simulation. Commercial graphics generator Prepar3D also began as a game and is now a Lockheed Martin product. While today’s graphics are exponentially ahead of their earlier game ancestors, it is still the gaming industry and its resources that propel improvement.


Vast visual improvements have also occurred with new technology projectors that include incredible resolution and fidelity. Graphics are so clear that you have to look hard to see they are generated.


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