search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Photo: PRNG DEPLOYMENTS & SERVICE


Since 9/11, the U.S. has maintained a steady presence in the Middle East. The PRNG aviation unit has proudly served alongside their regular Army colleagues over the last decade, with deployments in 2006-07 and 2011-12. The fixed-wing detachment mobilized in 2009-10 and 2012-13. Currently, the aviation maintenance unit is deployed while the flight unit is mobilizing back to Kuwait.


The aviation unit also supports disaster relief and humanitarian operations south of the U.S. border. For example, PRNG was the first Department of Defense aviation asset to arrive in Haiti and heavily aid in the aftermath of the 7.0 magnitude earthquake that killed 160,000 people in 2010.


However, the unit’s real strength lies in its ability to support missions in Central American and South American nations like Guatemala, Honduras, and Colombia, as well as Caribbean countries with large Hispanic populations, like the Dominican Republic. “We want to be the go-to guys when it comes to National Guard support south of the U.S. border,” says Maj. Vicens. “We know the language and the culture in Latin and Hispanic countries, so it’s much easier for us to get the job done, as opposed to say, a unit from Minnesota.” He then laughs, “No offense to NG units in Minnesota!”


The aviation unit’s commanders believe that mini-deployments off the island are good. Not only do such deployments leverage the unit’s strengths in support of the larger U.S. Army National Guard mission, but they also stretch crews by providing greater operational experiences. All this makes for a more qualified and capable unit.


rotorcraftpro.com


47


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86