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Hanga Talk Air Evac Lifeteam SMS Program Earns FAA Validation


Air Evac Lifeteam’s continued commitment to safety was recently validated by the FAA when its safety management system (SMS) was awarded the designation of “active conformance.” This is the highest status an SMS can achieve. Tom Baldwin, Air Evac Lifeteam’s SMS manager, said the company’s SMS is an organization-wide comprehensive and preventive approach to managing risk and promoting safety.


“A safety management system includes employee and leadership safety accountability, formal methods for identifying hazards and mitigating risk, and promotion of a positive safety culture,” Baldwin said. “The SMS also provides assurance of the overall safety performance of our organization. The SMS aids Air Evac leadership, management teams, and employees in making effective and informed safety decisions. Those in the health care setting may recognize some of the fundamental pieces of SMS as those found in modern quality management systems.”


Seth Myers, president of Air Evac Lifeteam, said the development and maintenance of an SMS is a voluntary initiative for helicopter air ambulance providers; it is not mandated by the FAA. “The inspection process used by the FAA during plan validation is vigorous and comprehensive,” Myers said. “Achieving this validation is a reflection of our ongoing commitment to the safety of our employees, our customers, and those entrusted to our care. This makes Air Evac Lifeteam one of a handful of companies in the general aviation community to be validated in the newly revised program.”


Call for Papers Issued for 2017 CHC Safety & Quality Summit in Dallas


The formal call for papers is officially out for the 2017 CHC Safety & Quality Summit, focusing on the theme “Can we truly manage all of the risk: what if the barriers are not as robust as we think?”


In its 12-year history, the Summit has grown to become an industry-leading aviation safety event. This year’s Summit will take place Sept. 27 through Sept. 29 at the Gaylord Texan Resort & Convention Center near Dallas, Texas. Each year, the Summit draws hundreds of attendees who gather to hear speakers including experts from the aviation, oil and gas, and safety industries. Speakers share best practices and present on topics with an aim toward making the helicopter transport and aviation industry better through promoting excellence in safety and human factors.


Most sessions have a 90-minute scheduled timeframe, however that can vary depending on the topic presented. Those interested in leading a session during the three-day event are encouraged to visit www.chcsafetyqualitysummit.com to access a submission form for papers and other information.


Metro Aviation Receives HeliSAS STC for EC145e


Metro Aviation, with the Genesys Group, recently received a supplemental type certificate (STC) for the EC145e, a lightweight twin-engine aircraft maintaining the same power, performance, and reliability of the legacy EC145.


The aircraft is now approved for two-axis autopilot. HeliSAS provides a full array of workload-reducing capabilities for piloting under visual flight rules (VFR), and provides situational stability should pilots encounter instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) in flight. The EC145e can accommodate up to five specialty care clinicians, or four clinicians and a family member. Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta flies more than 30,000 miles annually in Georgia’s only dedicated pediatric helicopter.


Want more news? • Visit RotorcraftPro.com or subscribe to our Heli-Industry Week in Review e-newsletter


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