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Hanga Talk Bell Helicopter Announces Deal with New South Wales Police Force


Bell Helicopter announced the signed purchase agreement for a Bell 412EPI to Australia’s New South Wales Police Force. “The Bell 412EPI continues to play a vital role for mission-critical helicopter operations around the world,” said Sameer A. Rehman, Bell Helicopter’s managing director of Asia Pacific. “We are very pleased that the New South Wales Police Force has once again placed their trust in Bell Helicopter and in the Bell 412EPI to serve and protect the people of New South Wales.”


The Bell 412EPI improves the Bell 412 platform with the Bell BasiX Pro™ fully integrated glass flight deck. The Bell BasiX Pro™ system is designed to meet the requirements of twin-engine helicopters and is optimized for IFR, Category A, and JAR OPS3-compliant operations. The avionics suite also includes high-resolution digital maps, electronic charts and approach plates, ADS-B transponder, and optional HTAWS and XM satellite links. Furthermore, the Bell 412EPI’s Pratt and Whitney’s PT6T-9 Twin Pac® engines, provides 15 percent more horsepower than the standard Bell 412.


Survival Flight Unlocks the Chains of Ground- Based VHF with IRIS


Air medical service provider Survival Flight LLC is currently equipping their fleet of Bell 407 helicopters with Outerlink Global Solutions’ next-generation IRIS system. The IRIS system provides voice, video, and flight data recording with a limitless broadband push- to-talk (PTT) voice over internet protocol (VoIP) radio, and high frequency tracking system. While the voice, video, and flight data recorder provides compliance with the recent FAA HEMS rule, the PTT satellite- based VoIP radio allows operators to maintain constant voice communications and relieves them of the expense and limitations of a ground-based VHF radio network.


“When you add up all the associated capital and recurring costs of building and maintaining a ground- based communications network, the costs are a lot higher than simply accounting for tower rental,” said Chris Millard, president of Survival Flight. “We found the traditional satellite phone to be restrictive with just one-to-one communication, and also very expensive. The IRIS system removes the range limitation and expense of ground-based VHF and allows us to only pay for the time we use, measured down to the second, not the minute. IRIS really enhances our communication by giving us multiple, completely private, and secure “channels” that many aircraft and ground bases can share at no additional cost.”


Customers are only charged for VoIP data they send over the network utilizing the IRIS satellite-based radio. This allows customers to build numerous “groups” of aircraft and only pay for what is transmitted, and not for what anyone monitoring the channel “hears.”


The approx. number of sessions offered on three tracks (policy, technology, and business solutions) at the Association for Unmanned Vehicle


200


Systems International (AUVSI) XPONENTIAL trade show, May 8-11 in Dallas. Rotorcraft Pro will be there with bonus distribution!


32 Jan/Feb 2017


The dollar amount of a possible U.S. State Dept.-approved foreign military sale to Kuwait for AH-64D Apache support services


400,000,000


Bonnie Haner’s age when she received her first helicopter ride in January. The Alice, Texas, resident’s wish was


102


granted by pilot Gary Jones in what Ms. Haner called “a bird.”


Credit: J. Munson, KIII TV


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