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ANSWER: Te SAMHSA policy is clear that personal items (including firearms) cannot be taken into the restroom. We have heard others doing #2 (specifically the donor places the items/firearm into the lock box and it is never touched by the collector and the donor keeps possession of the key to the lock box) or having a supervisor of the employee accompany the donor to the collection site to take possession of the firearm during the collection process. Explain to your client that allowing the donor to take personal items (firearm) into the restroom would negate their entire testing program since that gives the donor a way to conceal an adulterant. htp://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/ files/workplace/specimen-collection- handbook-2015.pdf


QUESTION: A company is requesting the specific drug for which an employee came up positive. Are we allowed to give them the information on the specific drug without violating HIPAA regulations?


ANSWER: You have to include the drug(s) if is positive for in the report to the DER. If you aren’t doing that, then they are in violation of DOT regulations. Usually the report comes from the MRO to the employer, but if you are acting as a C/TPA intermediary then you have to abide by the same reporting requirements. Please also see the DOT HIPAA statement: htps://www. transportation.gov/odapc/hipaa-statement. §40.163; §40.165; §40.345 ❚


Explain to your client that allowing the donor to take personal items (firearm) into the restroom would negate their entire testing program since that gives the donor a way to conceal an adulterant.


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