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Introduction1 Tere are many new and fast-evolving developments impacting workplace drug testing these days. One area that is oſten overlooked involves union issues. If your employees are members of a union, you should be aware of a recent ruling that could impact your testing program. Tis article focuses on that key ruling and the changes it brings.


Background


You have an employee who is suspected of coming to work under the influence. You confront her and ask her to take a drug test. She says she will, but she would like to talk to her union representative first. What do you do?


Must you allow your employee time to contact her


union representative? If so, how much time? What happens if you demand that the employee take the test and then consult with their union representative? Tese questions have been litigated in our courts


and before the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) for more than 40 years. Te most recent NLRB decision2


adds a new wrinkle to an old rule and may require changes to your testing procedures.


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