This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
that do a lot of in-town deliveries — have developed corporate sustainability policies that include using CNG-fueled vehicles. Some major trucking companies are being pushed to convert to CNG because their clients are demanding it. As a company, Stirk has focused on


forming partnerships with owners of existing travel centers to install CNG fueling stations at their facilities. Tat strategy concentrates CNG infrastructure along identified travel corridors rather than at individual fleets’ headquarters, McClymont said. “To go stick one at somebody’s facility and


get people on an interstate to come to that facility is hard to do,” he said. “You have to pay a driver and burn fuel to travel to stations, and that erodes your savings. It behooves you to set it up at a spot that they’re already stopping at.” Stirk’s goal is to build an infrastructure of


CNG stations around the Midwest catering to the Class A market. In each location, Stirk hooks up to the local natural gas utility, takes gas off the utility’s pipeline, and runs it through their own compressor. Ten, they partner


with a local travel center to sell the compressed natural gas to truck drivers. Stirk’s first venture was a fast-fill station at an existing Sapp Brothers travel center in Lincoln. “When we developed that relationship,


it allowed us to work with them to start to establish that network of stations because of their presences in truck stops on the I-80 corridor,” Hoelscher said. “Our first was in Lincoln, then Columbus, and the third opened in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Our fourth is opening soon in Commerce City, just north of Denver. Te ultimate plan is to work with fleets to try to establish and grow the network that will allow more and more fleets to utilize CNG trucks.” For now, CNG retail companies like


Stirk view each other as collaborators rather than competitors, Hoelscher said. Tey’re all still working to create a foundational CNG infrastructure to help grow the overall CNG market. “We’re linking together as networks,”


Hoelscher said. “Tere’s a station in Omaha that opened for Warner about a year ago. We


opened a station in Council Bluffs, Iowa, across the Missouri River. Tey’re 20 miles apart, but that’s huge in the fleet game. We bookend Omaha, but that station covers I-80 and I-29 corridors, north-south and east-west. For a lot of fleets, going 20 miles out of the way — they’re just not going to do it.” Tere are seven public-access CNG stations


in Nebraska now, Hoelscher said. While that’s not a huge number, they’re positioned in such a way that CNG is an option for a variety of route types. “A lot of fleets are looking at CNG for line


hauling or dedicated routes,” he said. “What we’re doing right now with our truck is running a hopper trailer on it. We’re running regionally around Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska and Iowa, going different places every day. Since we have a 600-mile range, we can run commodities on a regional basis. We’re easily able to show that irregular regional routes can run.” Other changes are making it more


realistic for fleets to use dedicated CNG trucks. In 2011, Cummins-Westport began manufacturing the first 12-liter CNG engines.


Contact Bauer Built For All of Your Commercial Tire Needs or All of Your Commer


◦ NEW & RETREAD TIRES ◦ ON-SITE & IN-STORE SERVICES ◦ FLEET MAINTENANCE PROGRAMS ◦ CERTIFIED HUNTER ALIGNMENTS ◦ MOUNTED WHEEL PROGRAMS ◦ WHEEL RECONDITIONING ◦ 24/7/365 DAYS-A-YEAR ERS SERVICE


LOCATIONS ACROSS NEBRASKA AND THE MIDWEST NEBRASKA


FREMONT


GRAND ISLAND 3334 W Cougar Drive, 308-382-8167 LEXINGTON LINCOLN NORFOLK OMAHA


2547 W 23rd Drive, 402-753-2979 75479 Road 435, 308-324-4881


7800 North 56, 402-464-7800 2200 S Highway 81, 402-379-4494 7728 F Street, 402-331-1999


Plus IOWA, ILLINOIS, INDIANA, MINNESOTA, NORTH DAKOTA & WISCONSIN


8 NEBRASKA TRUCKER — ISSUE 5, 2015 — www.nebtrucking.com www.bauerbuilt.com l Tire Needs


24 / 7 / 365 ERS SERVICES 800-268-5114


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28