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The Rideau Canal.


The War Memorial.


The Chateau Laurier seen from outside East Block.


million restaurants. It’s a wonderful place to hang out for an afternoon or evening, exploring all the little shops and galleries, not to mention the bars and nightlife options later in the day. A little further up the street you will come across the National Gallery of Canada – you can’t miss its glassy splendour. If you continue north, past a couple of dignified federal in- stitutions on Sussex Drive, you will eventually round a curve and reach the Prime Minister’s residence at 24 Sussex Dr. Kitty corner from that sits stately Rideau Hall, home of the Governor General. It is set in a lovely 79-acre park that is sometimes open to the public. So are the state halls at certain times of the year. Carrying on up Sussex will take you past toney Rockcliffe,


which was a separate village until 2001 when it was annexed by the City of Ottawa. One of the wealthiest neighbour- hoods in Canada, the parklike district is home to many am- bassadorial residences. Te city is full of art galleries, book stores and at least 15


museums. Across the Ottawa River in Gatineau (formerly Hull) is the not-to-be-missed Museum of History (formerly the Museum of Civilization). Te building was designed by Aboriginal architect Douglas Cardinal, who at 81, has just been commissioned to help with the soon-to-be-iconic Ca-


thehubwinnipeg.com


Gatineau with the Museum in the background.


nadian History hall slated to help celebrate our 150th birth- day when it opens in 2017. While you are in Gatineau, be sure to stop at one of the many exquisite restaurants. For Canadians, a visit to Ottawa is different from a visit


to any other city in Canada. You will marvel at the beautiful Library of Parliament that survived the terrible fire of 1916. You will want to drop into the Canadian War Museum and the Canada Aviation and Space Museum. Go to an event at the National Arts Centre. Watch the Changing of the Guard. Climb the Peace tower and search for family names on the open pages in the Books of Remembrance listing our war heroes . . . I promise a lump in your throat up there that will force you to turn your eyes to the magnificent view of Parliament Hill and the glorious Ottawa River below as you regain your composure. Most of all, though, you will feel the history of our country


through the echo of your footsteps in Parliament’s marble halls. As you peer into the chamber, imagine your idols of the past, sometimes laughing and jousting and, at other times, speaking movingly from their hearts. All wanted the same thing: to carve out a mighty nation. Many like to be cynical about our government, but I defy


you not to get just a bit choked up at some point during your visit.


Fall 2015 • 63


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