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The steeply pitched green roof is an iconic part of the Winnipeg skyline.


The hotel retains much of its detail and charm.


local businessman whose own father at one time owned the San Antonio Gold Mines and one of the early professional hockey teams in Winnipeg. Te Perrins felt passionately that the hotel should be preserved and they invested heavily in upgrades. Tey were hampered by the years of neglect that preceded their ownership and then, two historic des- ignations. Te first, in 1980, was by the federal government and later, in 1989, came a provincial historic designation, both of which severely limited plans for further rehabilitation and development. In 1987, the Perrin family had the hotel seized by the city for back taxes in amounts that exceeded the original construction cost. It was then sold to the Malenfant family of Quebec for $1 million. Tat family, too ran into trouble, and the hotel was acquired in 1993 by Quincailleriers Laberge Inc., who brought in Rick Bell and Ida Albo. Te young couple had been managing the food services for their restaurant at Te Forks. Now they would manage the hotel and become part owners. Te combination and investment in serious upgrading have paid off. Over the years, the hotel has gained


This historic hotel has been hosting elegant events since the early 1900s. 30 • Fall 2015


a reputation for hosting gala events and luxurious weddings. It is a favoured meeting place for business people. Most recently the hotel has added a luxuri- ous spa on the 10th floor, appropriately named Ten Spa. Te Fort Garry Hotel is listed as a National Historic Site in both Canada and Manitoba, and is a treasured part of Winnipeg’s history and on-going story.


The Hub


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