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gerous feat led to an annual special on NBC. Doug Henning’s World of Magic earned him seven Emmy nominations and one win. Fans of Michael Jackson’s 1984 Victory Tour can credit Doug Henning with the illusions that supported it. He also created illusions for Earth Wind and Fire and appeared on Te Muppet Show many times. In later years, Doug became obsessed with transcendental meditation and ran for Parliament in the United Kingdom for the Natural Law Party, limping in last with 173 votes and proving that it takes more than magic to convince an elector- ate. Undaunted, in 1993, he ran for the Natural Law Party of Canada in Rosedale, where he came in sixth out of 10 candi- dates ( Jack Layton came in fourth). Just seven years later, at the premature age of 52, he died of


liver cancer. Doug Henning has been credited with changing the face of magic from the top-hatted, tuxedo-wearing image of the first half of the last century to his own laid back, long-haired style that opened the doors for the personalized images of today. Darcy Oake


When you speak of Manitoba magicians, no name is more


current than that of Darcy Oake, the 26-year-old illusionist from Winnipeg, who came in fifth in Britain’s Got Talent con- test last year. He wowed audiences worldwide and achieved instant fame with his (literally) jaw-dropping illusions. Son of Hockey Night in Canada’s Scott Oake, Darcy got


hooked on magic the first time his dad drew his card from a shuffled deck. Even though it was just a lucky mistake on Scott’s part, Darcy was captivated and began reading and learning about magic from that moment on. When he performed for the first time on Britain’s Got Tal-


ent, the judges were gob-smacked and the audience went wild. Simon Cowell said Darcy was “without question the best ma- gician ever on Britain’s Got Talent”. He is a super star on You- Tube with over 52 million hits. Darcy Oake is coming home this fall after a spectacularly successful world tour, Edge of Reality. He will be playing at the MTS Centre Dec. 4, 2015. It’s


probably a good idea to get your tickets now. Many others


Not as well known to the general public, but just as well


received, is Winnipeg’s Brian Glow. Brian specializes in cor- porate entertainment, creating unique shows for corporations around the world. Brian excels at close-up, one-man shows, but he also mounts elaborate productions that are among the largest magical illusion shows in the world. He has created special effects and magic illusion concerts for major sporting events such as the Winter Olympics and Pan American Games, the Grey Cup and JUNO music awards. Brian has been at his trade for 40 years. His spectacularly


staged acts are laced with humour. Few know this, but Winnipeg is the birthplace of the Inter-


national Brotherhood of Magicians, which has 15,000 mem- bers in 33 countries and is now headquartered in St. Charles, Mo. It was started in 1922 by Winnipeg magician Len Vintus who lived to 95 and died in 1999. Other Manitoba magicians who have earned a name in- clude Shaun Farquhar, born 1961 in Portage la Prairie. Shaun


thehubwinnipeg.com


Doug Henning brought magic down to earth with his laid-back style.


earned the Grand Prix World Championship of Magic from the International Federation of Magicians Society; Greg Wood, a comic illusionist, and Brian Zembic, best known as the “Wiz” who, though a magician, gained fame as a gambler. He once had breasts implanted after he lost a bet!


Fall 2015 • 47 Don’t miss Darcy Oake this Dec. 4 at the MTS Centre.


Photo courtesy of NBC Television.


Photo by Matt Barnes.


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