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Instead, the Agreement is merely an affirmation of a tacit understanding that a maritime boundary exists.


The Court then examined the nature of the agreed maritime boundary and concluded that because the 1974 Proclamations and the 1952 Santiago Declaration did not draw distinctions between the water column and seabed, an all-purpose bound- ary exists between both States. To determine the extent of the boundary, the Court examined each Party’s relevant practice, fishing potential, and ac- tivity and the contemporaneous developments in the law of the sea during the 1950s.


First, the Court found that the fish species being harvested during the early 1950s were generally within a 60 nautical mile range from the coastline.


During this period, mostly small fishing vessels departed from both Parties’ major relevant ports, supporting the Court’s conclusion that the Parties were unlikely to have considered the agreed mari- time boundary to extend all the way to the 200 nautical mile limit. Second, the Court examined the relevant practice of other States and the work of the International Law Commission on maritime law during the 1950s, finding that the agreed maritime boundary along the parallel extended to a distance of 80 nautical miles along the parallel from its starting point.


To determine the starting point of the maritime boundary, the Court examined the travaux pré- paratoires leading up to the 1968-1969 lighthouse arrangements, whereby both Parties agreed to


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www.bc.edu/llm bcllm@bc.edu 885 Centre Street • Newton, Massachusetts 02459 • USA ILSA Quarterly » volume 22 » issue 4 » May 2014


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