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billion live bacteria needed to restore gut health. “Every human is unique; try different products in search of what works,” he says.


Probiotic supplements may be more effective for people with seri- ous digestive distress that need higher bacterial counts and the product label may provide specifics of the bacteria and strains. “For example, Lactobacil- lus rhamnosus GG is a strain that has been proven to be effective against antibiotic-induced diarrhea,” Marco explains. High-quality probiotics usu- ally require refrigeration to keep the bacteria alive.


In addition, there are many non- fermented foods, including certain juices, candies and energy bars, with specific strains of bacteria added that have probiotic effects.


Kathleen Barnes is the author of a wide variety of natural health books including 8 Weeks to Vibrant Health, with Dr. Hyla Cass. Connect at KathleenBarnes.com.


Safe Digestive Relief


In addition to fermented foods, these foods offer digestive relief.


Ginger: Safe enough to quell the nausea of early pregnancy, ginger can offer relief from nausea, gas and even colic in babies.


Peppermint Oil: A traditional remedy now validated by science, pepper- mint oil can relieve irritable bowels and heartburn. Consider enteric coated (acid resistant) capsules that can impact the small intestine, where relief is needed.


Fennel: This mildly licorice-flavored seed hasn’t been extensively studied, but lovers of Indian cuisine have tra- ditionally used it to promote smooth digestion after consuming curry- laden meals.


Sources: American Botanical Coun- cil; Mayo Clinic, MN; Baylor Uni- versity, TX; University of Michigan; University of Rochester, NY


natural awakenings May 2014 27


Simple Sauerkraut Recipe


It’s easy to make a healthy batch of sauerkraut in a glass quart canning jar in as little as three days.


Organic cabbage, finely shredded 1 Tbsp sea salt or other natural salt


Mix salt and cabbage together in a large bowl, squeezing the salt into the cabbage. Cabbage will become limp and begin to release its juice.


Tightly pack cabbage and juice into a clean glass canning jar. Keep the cab- bage submerged in liquid; if necessary, use a smaller canning jar loaded with marbles or stones.


Cover jar with a clean cloth or piece of cheesecloth and keep it in a cool place.


Jar contents will begin to bubble, signal- ing that fermentation is taking place (note that conventional cabbage ad- ditives may interrupt the fermentation process).


It’s ready to eat in three days, but keeps well for several weeks in the refrigerator.


Primary source: TheKitchen.com


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