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Merciér Pelvic Massage Boosts Women’s Fertility A


new, noninvasive infertility treat- ment has met with highly favorable results. In a recent study published in the journal Midwifery Today, 40 of 48 women between ages 28 and 42 that underwent two or more sessions of Merciér Therapy achieved pregnancy within the first year; 32 of those used the method alone (no other artificial fertilization/insemination techniques). The four-year study was presented at the 2013 World Congress of Low Back and Pelvic Pain.


The Merciér Method was developed by Jennifer Merciér, a midwife and holistic women’s health practitioner. The regimen includes six hours of pelvic organ mas- sage manipulation, along with a supplement program and continuous monitoring. She explains, “Our protocol is a gentle and noninvasive visceral manipulation of the female reproductive organs that helps to increase general organ mobility and blood flow, which enhances optimal function.” A documentary on the protocol, Fertility: The Shared Journey with Merciér Therapy, premieres this month (MercierMovie.com).


Vitamin D No Help for Bone Mass or Hip Fractures U


niversity of Pittsburgh researchers that followed 29,862 women for 11 years have found that supplementing calcium with vitamin D does not re- duce hip fractures. The study, published in the Journal of Women’s Health, found that women taking calcium plus vitamin D had as many hip fractures as women taking a placebo. Women supplementing with more than 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D per day also had a 28 percent higher incidence of breast cancer.


Because hip fractures are linked to a reduction


in bone density, these findings are compounded by a review of research published in The Lancet, which established that vitamin D supplements typically taken with calcium did not increase bone density among elderly adults. The review analyzed 23 studies among 4,082 participants, 92 percent of whom were women.


Drinking Cow’s Milk While Nursing Linked to Infant Eczema N


ew re- search


has found that if a mother drinks cow’s


milk dur- ing the period that she is breast- feeding, it raises her


infant’s risk of experiencing skin al- lergies. The study, published in the Journal of the Medical Association of Thailand, followed 62 mothers and their infants from birth through 4 months of age. Researchers from Bangkok’s Mahidol University assembled the mothers and infants into two groups. Mothers in one group drank cow’s milk during the first four months of breastfeeding; the control group did not. Eight of the children with mothers drinking cow’s milk had skin allergies, versus two of the children in the control group. All of the mothers exclusively breastfed their infants throughout this period. An earlier study published in


Read more at NAHudson.com 10 Hudson County NAHudson.com


the British Medical Journal followed 124 mothers, 97 of which breastfed their babies. Of those that breast- fed, 48 drank no milk or other dairy products and 49 drank milk. Infants in the milk-drinking group experi- enced 21 cases of eczema, while the no-milk group had only 11 cases. Overall, between the breast- fed and non-breastfed infants, the breastfed infants had lower inci- dences of eczema regardless of the mother’s diet.


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