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Vermont wildcrafter Nova Kim


teaches her students not only how to identify wild edibles, but also how to harvest them sustainably. It’s critical to make sure wild foods will be available for future generations.


Fermentation Kefir, kimchi, kombucha and sauerkraut all owe their unique flavors to fermentation. Sandor Katz, author of The Art of Fermentation: An In-Depth Exploration of Essential Concepts and Processes From Around the World, is a self-described “fermentation revivalist”. He explains how microorganisms, such as lactic acid bacteria that are universally present on raw vegetables and in milk, transform fresh food into preserved sustenance. Katz recalls how his boyhood love for


sour pickles grew to an “obsession with all things fermented.” An abundant garden crop of cabbage left him wondering, “What are we going to do with all that cabbage?” The answer came naturally: “Let’s make sauerkraut.” Subsequently, Katz has become an international expert on the art and science of fermentation from wine to brine and beyond, collecting recipes and wisdom from past generations (WildFermentation.com). He observes, “Every single culture enjoys fermented foods.”


Increasing respect and reverence for fermented foods and related communities of beneficial microorganisms is a new frontier in nutrition and medical sciences. For example, several researchers at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics annual meeting last fall in Houston, Texas, described the connections between the trillions of bacteria living in the human gut, known as the “microbiota”, and mental and physical health. Kelly Tappenden, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition and gastrointestinal physiology with the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, explained that gut bacteria play a variety of roles, including assisting in the digestion and absorption of nutrients; influencing gene expression; supporting the immune system; and affecting body weight and susceptibility to chronic disease.


Feed Matters The popular adage, “We are what we eat,” applies to animals, as well. New research from Washington State University shows


SAVE THE DATE! Announcing the Spring 2014


Healthy Living, Healthy Planet Expo at Rackspace Hosting!


SATURDAY, MAY 17 12 – 4 p.m.


CALL FOR VENDORS!


• Reach a potential audience of several thousand “Rackers” and their families and hundreds of highly targeted, health-minded area residents!


• Showcase your health-focused and Earth-friendly products/services!


• $149 Event Exhibitor Fee + $50 City of Windcrest Vendor Fee


• Indoor Rackspace Exhibition Hall - SPACE IS LIMITED!


Reserve your vendor space today! Contact Claire at 210-667-5421 or Jen at 210-612-9644 or email drew@elevatelifewellness.com.


HOSTED BY:


Watch for more information in the April issue of Natural Awakenings!


NaturalAwakeningsSA.com March 2014 15


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