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News Flat Living FPRAevent TUPEchanges what’s happenIng In the leasehold sector Tax AbolishstAmpdutysAystpA


More than athird of home buyers will paymorethan £7,500 in StampDutyby2018 accordingtonew researchfrom theTaxpayers’ Alliance,which lobbies government on behalf of its 75,000members on tax- relatedissues.The TPAresearch publishedthissummer, reveals that four outofevery five homes sold in 2012-13willbesubject to Stamp Duty within five years


Technology


generAtion Accordingtoanationwide survey commissioned by Sky, more than half of 18-34 year olds in theUKnow expectaccessto adigital TV serviceasstandard in their homes. Our younger generationsnow seeaccess to digitalTVasaneveryday necessity likeother utilities such as gas and electricity, with only aquarter of thosesurveyed stillconsidering digitalTV services a luxury in their home. The survey of 2,000 people


Firsthomes mustcAter FortV-sAVVy


found that only 4% of young peoplewould nowsettlefor just terrestrial TV in their newhome, whereasahuge78% of people surveyed want access to a digital TV service. BrendanHegarty, Head of SkyCommunal TV, comments:“Thereare morethan 14 million18-34 yearsoldsinthe UKandbased on ourresearch results, thatmeans there are more than seven million young peopleout thereexpecting a digitalTVservice as standard in their first flat.” Asignificant39% of


respondents not only expect a digitalTVservice butwantit to be in and running within 48 hours. The vastmajority of young people (81%) would expecttohavetheir digital TV service installed within seven days. For other findings fromthe survey, you can read


more at http://communaltv.sky. com/media/38227/generation_ research.pdf


Flat Living Issue 16


and that 40%of homes sold will be subject to Stamp Duty of 3% or more, leaving buyers with a bill of at least £7,500. Property priceforecastsby


Savills Research predict a huge increase in the number of homes which will be subject to punitive ratesofStampDuty.The forecast pricerises will lead to theliability of nearly 100,000 homeswhich incurred 1% Stamp Duty in 2012-


13 morethantripling, as they become subject to the 3% rate. The TPA believes that Stamp


Duty is an unfair double tax and should eventually be abolished. Thealliancebelieves It stopsyoung people buying a homeand starting a family; discourages elderly people from downsizing andmakes it harder forpeopletomovetonew places fornew jobs. TheTPA recently


launched its Stamp OutStamp Duty campaign calling for a cut in Stamp Duty. The alliance claimsthatnew analysis shows substantial reforms to ease the burden on home-buyersand limitthe economic distortions created by the tax are possible with little or even no impact on overalltax receipts.Tofind out


more about the TPA go towww. taxpayersalliance.com


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offices Tohomes maidenheadseesfirstoffice-to-resirentalblock


london-basedessential livinghasunveileddesignsfor itsfirst office-to-residentialrentedhousingschemein maidenhead.Undernewplanningregulationsbroughtin bythegovernmentearlierthisyear,developersarenow able toconvertunwantedofficespacetonewhomes, withouthavingtogothroughalengthyapprovals process. Plans,submittedtothecouncilbyessential living


attheendofaugust,wouldseeBerkshirehouse,a 12-storeyofficebuilding, transformedintoastriking centrepieceforthetowncentre.Theblockwill include 68unitsrangingfromspaciousstudioapartments to largertwobedroomunitswhicharespecifically


designedfortheprivaterentedsector.facilitieswithin thebuildingcompriseaclub-loungeandterraceatthe topofthetower,agym,twooffice/meetingroomsand secondfloorcommunalamenityarea.Therewill also bea24-hourconcierge.essential livingaimsnotonly tocreateaservice-ledcultureinrentalpropertybut to transformrentingintoalifestylechoice,ratherthana stop-gaptoownership. Berkshirehouseisnottheonly1960sofficeblockthe


companyishopingtoredevelop.asreportedinthelast issueof FlatLiving,northlondon’sarchwayTowerwas alsoacquiredthisyear,withsimilarplanstooverhaula vacantofficeblockintopremiumqualityhousing.


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