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Eat a healthy diet. This means


lots of vegetables and fish, some lean meats and poultry and moder- ate amounts of fruits and grains for weight control; abundant antioxidants to prevent deterioration that leads to chronic disease; and vital nutrients to support and extend life. Avoid sugars in all forms, simple carbohydrates, processed foods and for many, wheat and wheat gluten, especially for those with excess abdominal fat. Get a good night’s sleep. Eight hours is more than beauty sleep. Studies consistently report that it’s essential for energy and the prevention of a host of diseases, including obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer (Nurses’ Health Study; plus UK research in Diabetes Care, the European Heart Journal and British Journal of Cancer). Regular turn- ing in and waking times, plus sleeping in a dark room, are important to optimize melatonin production; it is not true that we need less sleep as we age. Use the right supplements. Take a high-quality multivitamin every day, preferably an organic product based on whole foods for optimum nutri- tion. Fish oil is also essential for nearly everyone for heart, brain and joint health. Vitamin D is critical, especially in the winter months and for darker- skinned people that need greater sun exposure to manufacture it. Also add


curcumin; according to numerous clinical studies, including those from Baylor University and the University of California-Los Angeles, it can help prevent and even reverse cancer, Al- zheimer’s, osteoarthritis, skin diseases and digestive disorders.


Prevent Dementia Caregivers for parents or other rela- tives with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia are often concerned about experiencing such regression them- selves. “There is some evidence that a tendency to memory loss can be inherited, but in any case, there are things you can do to prevent and even possibly reverse memory loss,” coun- sels Noodleman.


Reducing stress is the best way to keep a sharp mind, she says. “Chronic stress inhibits the cerebral cortex (the brain’s gray matter, responsible for higher mind function, including memory), result- ing in a lack of judgment and other im- paired brain function. So, manage stress and memory function will improve.” Deep breathing and increased oxygenation of the blood helps relieve stress and deliver nutrients to brain cells. Practicing yoga postures like the shoulder stand and headstand, or exercises using an inversion table, for just a few minutes a day can improve circulation to the brain and may help


keep brain cells intact. “It’s important to keep brain cells


healthy and alive by keeping blood sug- ars and blood pressure under control,” urges Doctor of Osteopathy Lisa Gan- ghu, an internal medicine specialist and clinical assistant professor at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, in New York City. High blood pressure and diabetes are risk factors for strokes and mini-strokes that result in brain cell impairment, she says, adding, “Some research even suggests that caffeine may improve memory and focus.” “Use it or lose it,” concludes Dr.


Jacob Teitelbaum, an integrative medi- cal authority from Kona, Hawaii, and author of Real Cause, Real Cure. Ex- tensive research shows that challenging the brain with puzzles and language courses, having an active social life and getting regular exercise are all related to maintaining optimum brain health. “People who age gracefully are


physically and mentally active,” adds Noodleman.


Prevent Disease


A proper diet is a good place to start to take control. Ganghu recommends largely plant-based diets, like the Medi- terranean, to keep common repercus- sions of aging at bay. Teitelbaum contravenes traditional medicine’s stance and says that most


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Northern & Central New Mexico


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