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leaf and cascara sagrada, which are potent laxatives. Watson and Ber-


ry don’t recommend rigid “crash and burn” cleanses, such as those consisting solely of protein drinks or raw juices or lemon juice and water with maple syrup and cayenne pepper. “It’s better to


“Eighty percent of cancer cases are caused by


environmental and food carcinogens.”


~ National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences


cleanse gently with fresh green juices with meals consisting of brown rice and either raw, lightly steamed or roasted vegetables,” counsels Watson. “Any detox program, if followed by eating


whatever you want, not only doesn’t work, it has consequences,” adds Berry, who strongly advises easing back into a sensible diet after a cleanse. She notes that one client became ill from breaking her detox with a meal of barbeque ribs and beer.


Linda Sechrist is a senior staff writer for Natural Awakenings. She writes on why we are better together at ItsAllAboutWe.com.


Umeboshi Tea


Umeboshi plums, termed “the king of alkaline foods”, are a species of apri- cots from Japan. A pickled fruit, they have a sour and salty flavor. Drinking umeboshi tea alkalizes the blood and works to relieve fatigue, nausea and indigestion while restoring energy.


Makes 1 cup. Drink one a day for one month.


1 umeboshi plum, rinse 1 cup purified water ½ tsp Japanese kuzu powder 2 or 3 drops tamari or gluten-free tamari


1. Remove seed from the plum. Cut remaining plum into small pieces or mash.


2. Place plum pieces, water and kuzu in a small sauce pan. Stir or whisk to dissolve the powder. It will look like milk with pink bumps.


3. Stir while heating at medium temperature for 3 to 5 minutes or until liquid turns clear and appears a little thicker. Turn off heat. 4. Add tamari drops and stir gently. Drink while hot. Source: Recipe courtesy of Brenda Watson.


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Northern & Central New Mexico


NaturalAwakeningsNNM.com


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