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Noble eyes. Photo by Jo Danehy


Today only 28,000 run free. One important fact she had to work with was the American taxpayers are spending millions of dollars a year gathering, transporting, feeding and containing 40,000 wild horses. It is estimated each horse held in this fashion costs about $2,000 a year. Not a good plan for the taxpayer and a worse plan for the horses. She created Saving America’s Mustangs (SAM) and approached the BLM with a well-thought-out plan.


She asked the BLM: if she were to purchase a ranch and the grazing rights to the adjoining public land, would they convert the grazing rights from cat le to horses? She would put the land into a foundation and accept the 10,000 horses in short-term holding, saving the taxpay- ers millions. T e BLM liked the idea, but with four years of negotia- tions have not yet been able to get the plan accepted by Congress. Madeleine fi nds it a bit strange that, since the BLM likes the plan that would ease their burden both fi nancially and managerially, they can’t seem to move ahead. “I think it’s time Director Salazar exerts some eff ort and asks for Congress’ co-operation on this. It’ll save them money and it will save the Mustangs.” Madeleine said.


Her plan is a detailed pilot program totally funded without any taxpayer or government monies. Madeleine does not propose


solutions and then hold her hand out waiting for the government to write a check. Rather


“Mustang Monument, located in Nevada, is designed to be a permanent home to protect and care for wild horses currently held in captivity. But more than that, it is a sanctuary and a living museum where the public can visit, and learn about and appreciate the horses, American culture, ecology and much more.”


she meticulously structures her plans to save the taxpayers’ money. To date she has spent 12 million of her own dollars assembling lands, public and private, and saving 550 Mustangs she purchased right out of the auctions destined for slaughter. T ese 550 roam free on Warm Creek Ranch which is part of the 600,000 acres SAM has assembled that will soon become “Mustang Monument: Wild Horse Eco-Preserve.”


A PERMANENT HOME FOR AMERICA’S MUSTANGS Mustang Monument, located in Nevada, is designed to be a permanent home to protect


and care for wild horses currently held in captivity. But more than that, it is a sanctuary and a living museum where the public can visit, and learn about and appreciate the horses, American culture, ecology and much more. All under the watchful eyes of America’s Mustangs. Imagine taking your family to the wide-open range of Nevada and studying the stars and


planets together in a sky so close you’ll feel as if you can touch the Milky Way. You’ll be able to do that soon at Mustang Monument: Wild Horse Eco-Preserve, for there will be fun and educational programs for children and adults alike. Not only astronomy camps and programs, but plans are moving ahead with an impressive array of programs for families, students, Boy and Girl Scout Troops, ecologists, people with special needs and tourists from other countries to come and see the desert landscape in its most natural and preserved state. Programs in the fi eld and classrooms will introduce visitors to wild horses and Native


American culture. Guided hikes through the desert, camping in teepees, special campfi res with musical storytelling and Na- tive American legends, arts and craſt s, creative writing, photography, internships and learning the science of the land and caring for the horses will be just a few of the things guests can par- ticipate in. Also part of Mustang


Monument are programs for therapy and heal ing for wounded soldiers, the Good Grief Kids Camp for children of fallen soldiers, Going Green Interactive seminars and learning the


74 | August 2012 • WWW.TRAILBLAZERMAGAZINE.US


When visiting Mustang Monument, guests will live comfort- ably in TeePee Village. Photo courtesy Mustang Monument


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