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MUSIC IN OUR SCHOOLS MONTH Sarah Bush Randolph, Chairperson


or be judged and approved by other music professionals as “quality music” worthy of having their music published or performed by a professional for public performance. Musicians that passed the “quality music” scrutiny secured their work under copyright and received money for their work. Many were able to make a living doing it.


Nurturing the Creative Musician


“Creativity is the ability to reconfi gure what you know, often in the light of new information, and come up with an original concept or idea. In order to be creative, a person must be critical, selec- tive and generally intelligent.” (p. 168 T e Human Brain Book by Rita Carter).


Before musicians can create, they need a foundation of musical knowledge to build upon for the creative process, beginning with the fundamentals of music and working into more advanced theory, history, and appreciation. To nurture creative musicians, music educators need to establish an environment that allows the freedom to take risks without the threat of embarrassment, time to allow the brain to process new information, and quiet to allow the brain to build on the stimuli generating new thoughts and ideas.


In the past, musicians had professional music training, had to have an agent,


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Although some music software and tech- nology products encourage discovery and creativity while teaching music skills, it is limited to only basic skills. Students of tomorrow need a music educator to help them discover a deeper understanding of music to last a lifetime.


Today, without musical training or an agent, anyone can write, perform or create “music,” have it seen and heard by millions around the world through the Internet with little or no training, invest- ment, nor copyright security. Most of those people are not paid for their music creation. T ey just enjoy performing or composing/creating. T ey are in the lime light for a short time and then gone. T eir work will be lost forever. Consumers are overwhelmed by the mass number of music choices available today. T ey fi nd it diffi cult to fi nd quality new music amid the montage of amateurs.


“For the fi rst time, research shows that American creativity is declining. What went wrong–and how can we fi x it?”


“It’s too early to determine conclusively


why U.S. creativity scores are declining. One likely culprit is the number of hours kids now spend in front of the TV and playing video games rather than engaging in creative activities. Another is the lack of creative development in our schools . . . there’s no concerted eff ort to nurture the creativity of all children.” (from Newsweek www.thedailybeast.com/ newsweek/2010/07/10/the-creativity- crisis.html).


Time management is another contribut- ing factor to the decline in American creativity. Students and Americans in general need to realize that time is expen- sive, measureable and should be a priority. Students waste a lot of time in electronic media such as texting, facebook etc.


Music creativity today is intertwined with so many other areas including: multimedia, lighting eff ects, dance (exercise, movement), recording, listening (memory, therapy, expressing feelings), singing, and performing, among others. T roughout the process, students need help in an enjoyable and fun way from a music educator to discover and understand all aspects of music to then be able to create music. Music should be shared and enjoyed by everyone, across generations, to “Last a Lifetime.”


Music in Our Schools Month


High Schools, Colleges, and Commu- nities should participate in Music In Our Schools Month! It is not just for


Illinois Music Educator | Volume 72 Number 1


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