This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
struck. “It was constant


rescues for days,” he


recalls. But what about maintenance on the big


ship? With costs mounting and some multi-mil- lion dollar inspections creeping up on the old H3’s, Captain Duran sees a better use of tax- payer funds to simply buy a few new ships. The H3, originally conceived in the mid-1950’s and first flown in 1959, is just too old to keep air- worthy anymore. “We just cannot afford to keep the H3’s in the air. I can actually save monies by moving into another aircraft,” Duran says. Last summer, Air 5 pilots Tom Bogdan and


Mark Burnett were doing a check flight after some major maintenance had been completed. The ship, originally built in 1967, had accumulat- ed just over 13,000 hours of flight time. They were in a hover at 1000AGL over the water just south of their base at Long Beach, CA.


Pilot


Tom Bogdon was seated in the left seat and at the controls while Pilot Mark Burnett was right seat (PIC) executing the maintenance procedures and controlling the throttles. As he was advanc- ing the #1 engine and reducing the #2 engine, he heard a loud whirring sound. Mark told me his first thought was, “It’s about time these strange sounds happen when there are some maintenance staff on board!” Seconds later a loud snap was heard and Mark said he began to feel the aircraft settling and rocking from side to side. Mark, the senior of the two pilots with 8 years flying the H3, said, “I have the controls,” and immediately dropped collective and pushed the nose over to obtain an autorotation profile. Looking around all Mark could see was water. “It looked like we would be making a water land- ing, and water landings have uncertain outcomes,”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52