This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Local SF Operators Stopped Parking Tax Increase; You Can Too, They Say from Page 22


local newspapers and got all of themon their side.Theywere able to convince the mayor and some members of the board of super- visors that the tax increase was a bad idea. “Look,” said Leonoudakis, “we knew the city needed mon-


ey.We just didn’twant themto take it in thisway. Sowe gave the politicians other ideas for revenue generation, including better enforcement of existing parking revenue taxes and the increas- ing of on-street parking fees to market rates. We mentioned gasoline taxes.” In fact, the city of San Francisco has begun an extensive pro-


gram to set on-street parking rates using a market-based model. The “SF Park” program, one of themostwidespread in the coun- try, is just now going into effect. The program has some of its roots in that 2006 campaign by local parking interests. “We heldweeklymeetings, ran two polls –which by theway


are very expensive – had our employees wearing ‘No on E’T- shirts the lastweek before the election, andwe placed door hang- ers throughout the city. “Wewon by a landslide, a 67%majority,” Leonoudakis said. One of themain issues, he said, was the fact that the city has


great difficulty in collecting existing parking taxes. There is a 10%tax in San Francisco, and a number of so-called fly-by-night parking operators under-report their parking income, thus not paying their full share of taxes. The group in San Francisco volunteered to help the city col- lect those taxes and train city auditors in how to ensure that all


the revenue was reported. It also recommended a city ordinance that made property


owners responsible for taxes if their operators didn’t properly report and collect them. “The city is looking for revenue,” Leonoudakis said. “It


should properly collect the revenue currently due it, before increasing taxes that hurt legitimate business.An offshoot of the campaign to stop Prop. E was a leveling of the playing field in the city, ensuring that all operators paid the taxes due. “The city has not come back and tried to increase parking


taxes,” Leonoudakis said. “They know we are organized, know what we are doing, and will fight back.” Other cities are looking strongly at parking tax hikes as a


way to increase their revenue, and local groups are forming in opposition.Meetings have been held, as recently as lateApril in LosAngeles, to fight tax increases. Leonoudakis, Rob Zuritsky of Parkway and Roy Carter of


Toledo Ticket are championing a program, with the National ParkingAssociation (NPA), to let parking companies across the country knowjust howthe San Francisco group successfully beat back the tax increase. Also, a page will be up shortly at the NPA website


(www.npapark.com) that will provide tools that can be used to fight parking tax increases.


PT


See us at the IPI booth #151 24 MAY 2010 • PARKING TODAY • www.parkingtoday.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76