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PEOPLE IN PARKING High Concrete Group has intro-


duced ECast, a weight-saving precast concrete that allows the company to tai- lor the weight of precast members to specific project requirements. Formu- lated fromlightweight sands and aggre- gates, it helps to reduce transportation costs and fuel use. It joins High’s EcoMix supplementary cementitious materials as more sustainable concrete


that helps improve the carbon footprint of precast building projects by reduc- ing embodied energy. ECast also is used in the company’s CarbonCast line of thermally efficient facades and lightweight components. The British Parking Association


(BPA), backed by the National Health Service (NHS) Confederation and the Healthcare Facilities Consortium, has


launched a Charter for Hospital Park- ing. It is designed to encourage NHS Trusts to provide parking management systems that are fair for all. The BPA has produced guidelines to help Trusts and car park operators deliver effective and efficient parking for all users. The charter’s aim is to strike the right bal- ance between fairness for patients and visitors and hospital staff, as well as the Trust itself. Bird-B-Gone, a leading manufac-


turer and supplier of professional bird control products, has announced the Continued on Page 12


POINT OF VIEW from Page 8


– all paid for by a philanthropic organi- zation that made its money in the pri- vate sector. There was one bright spot. One of


UCLA Professor Don Shoup’s protégés sat next tome and toldme about a study hewas doing on abuse of disabled plac- ards. He and his staff go to areas of downtown LA and track every car that parks on the street. Every car! He said the only way to get good


information is to actually go there and do the work. “All good information comes from the field, not from esti- mates or computermodels,” he toldme. He and his staff are finding a high inci- dence of improper use of the disabled placard, with abuse found in more than 30%of the cases. The other issue is that the disabled


and those with disabled hangtags park on the street (where it is free), rather than in nearby parking structures,where the owners are required to have handi- capped spots reserved but may charge for them. This causes the streets to be jammed with parked cars and the park- ing structures with empty spaces. My dinner partners (with the


Shoup protégé on one side and aViet- nam-era DC consultant/revolving door academic on the other) agreed that the only solution was to take the incentive to cheat away and charge the dis- abled for parking. Free market,


See us at the IPI booth #429 10 MAY 2010 • PARKING TODAY • www.parkingtoday.com


right on. Shoupis- tas rule, but not too loudly in that room.


PT


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