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42 SPECTROSCOPY


‘listen’ for cancer while carrying out complex operations. As part of the work, the team took RS measurements with a Horiba LabRam HR800 spectrometer, with an air- cooled CLDS 785nm laser, coupled with a single edge filter. Spectra were collected with a 0.75 numerical aperture ×60 objective (LUMPlanFLN, Olympus) immersion lens with the confocal hole set to 100 µm for spectral acquisition. As Dr Matthew Baker, senior lecturer in Chemistry and Director of Knowledge Exchange (PAC) at the University of Strathclyde, explains, the project arose following discussions with neurosurgeons, where it became obvious that the creation of innovative inter-operative diagnostics technology would be a very welcome advance because the complete removal of the brain tumour is ‘paramount for the patient.’ “Currently a static image is used, which isn’t optimum as brain and patient can move slightly. Colleagues in the field are developing Raman probes that can be used for this


Horiba’s latest LabRam spectrometer


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