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The ecological quality of the area seems to be improving and stabilizing.


are finding will have the food they need to quickly grow into drag-pulling rod-benders within the next two to three years. We are still quite amazed at the sig- nificant and immediate positive effects of reopening Cedar Bayou. Although the bayou channel itself is naturally dynamic, often drastically changing from day to day, it is realizing its full natural role and potential. The ecological quality of the area seems to be improv- ing and stabilizing. Cedar Bayou is the talk among many anglers who are real- izing the fishing potential of the area firsthand. What makes Cedar Bayou so special goes well-beyond simply creat- ing more fish; the inlet also preserves the angling tradition and heritage of the Texas coast. The beauty and remote -


ness of this area coupled with its revered status, provides anglers with the ecological benefits of the restora- tion effort with the fishing experience of a bygone era.


Given the continued support from a legion of anglers, conservation organi- zations, and local governments, Cedar Bayou’s future as the Texas Coast’s crown jewel appears bright.


Quentin Hall just received his Master of Science in Marine Biology in December 2015 from Texas A&M-Corpus Christi and is now a professional scientist with the


Center for Sportfish Science and Conser - vation. Quentin’s studies on Cedar Bayou were the core of his thesis research.


Dr. Greg Stunz is marine biologist that specializes in sport-fisheries. He holds the Endowed Chair of Fisheries and Ocean Health at the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies and is a Professor of Marine Biology at Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi. He is the Director for the Center for Sportfish Science and Conser - vation. Read more about Cedar Bayou and their other fisheries research at: sportfishre- search.org.


TIDE


www.joincca.org


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