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Back to the soil


By ANASTASIA BUSIEK


Dave Miller (BS ’75) and


Stephen Rivard (BS ’75, MD ’79)


founded Iroquois Valley Farms, which converts


farmland back to an organic state.


his uncle’s 10-acre farm near Danforth, Illinois, in Iroquois County. He wanted to make a new career out of buying farms, managing them, and converting them back to organic. Miller brought his idea to Stephen Rivard (BS ’75, MD ’79), a friend since high school and his roommate at Loyola. “Dave and I have been dear friends all of our lives, effectively,” says Rivard. Rivard, who at the time co-directed the emergency medicine depart-


I 14 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY CHICAGO


ment at Good Shepherd Hospital in Barrington, Illinois, was interested in organic farming on the basis of its health implications. “The chemicals that are now in the DNA of our food are poisonous,” he says. “We can neither digest nor assimilate these chemicals. If what we eat has no contaminants and is not modified, it’s healthier for us.” With Miller’s business experience and Rivard’s medical expertise, the two came up with the concept that became Iroquois Valley Farms.


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n 2007, Dave Miller (BS ’75) left a 30-year career in banking and real estate finance management and moved into organic farmland investments. He had reconnected with friends and family who had been doing organic farming, and he decided to purchase


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