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FAST CLASS


By EMILIO IODICE • Vice President, Loyola University Chicago, Director of the John Felice Rome Center


Big ideas


ABRAHAM LINCOLN


He saved the union and ended slavery at a time when many doubted the wisdom of his cause.


NAPOLEON BONAPARTE


He believed he could build a Europe with one language, legal, gov- ernmental, commercial, and monetary system. Three hundred years later, the European Union came to be a reality.


(and the courage to lead)


These leaders were ahead of their times. Although they may have been flawed, they saw and helped create the shape of the future.


FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT


He was called a traitor to his class when he involved the government to heal the wounds of the Depres- sion. He created Lend- Lease to support England against Nazi Germany when many Americans wanted no involvement in the war. FDR knew what was ahead. He was ready to pay the price to aid the last bastion of democracy in Europe.


ELEANOR ROOSEVELT


In the early 1900s, Eleanor Roosevelt argued for the rights of women to vote, obtain equal pay, and participate in politics. She also worked to make lynching a federal crime and promote workers rights.


MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.


While in jail, Martin Luther King was told by men of the cloth that it was the wrong time to fight for civil rights. They told him to wait. Imagine if he had listened.


INSPIRED BY GREAT LEADERS OF HISTORY? • Speak up about doing the right thing, even if it’s unpopular. • Listen carefully. Counter with the facts and truth. • If wrong, admit it. Show a change of course and attitude. • It may cost you. Accept it instead of compromising honesty. Iodice is author of Profiles in Leadership: from Caesar to Modern Times. SPRING 2014 13


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