This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Up Front


EVERYTHING BOWLING, ALL THE TIME


Speed demon: Belmonte was a whirl- wind, throwing five strikes in 90 seconds.


Bottoms up: Not surprisingly, Weber took a back seat to no one, tossing four strikes in the Blind Bowling challenge and entertaining the crowd with his antics.


The most comical of the bunch, of


course, was Blind Bowling, in which a cur- tain perched several feet down lane pre- vented the bowlers from actually seeing the pins. Players bowled a ninth and 10th frame. Incredibly (or not!), Pete Weber, of the defending champion New York City WTT King Pins, tossed four consecutive strikes to win the competition. The speed bowling, or “Time to Bowl”


challenge, as it was called, required the players to see how many strikes they could bowl in 90 seconds. Philadelphia Hitman’s Bill O’Neill and L.A. X player Jason Belmonte each fired five strikes in the allotted time, with O’Neill winning a two-shot roll-off. “Apparently, that’s how I need to bowl from now on,” deadpanned


O’Neill. “I’ve got to just get up and run to the line.” Still to come on PBA telecasts are


the Obstacle Bowling, in which players try for high pin total in three shots, while avoiding a series of rubber pins positioned at various intervals down lane, and the TO Challenge. In the TO Challenge, players try to duplicate the shots of former National Football League star and PBA debutante Terrell Owens. (Aiming for splits cannot be easy!) Naturally, the PBAL Challenge was all


in good fun. Revenue generated from the PBA League Charity Auction, to be con- ducted on eBay during PBA League Week in January, will be donated to a charity selected by the player with the most points earned through the four events.


/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// ////////////////// December 2013 8


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31