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TOOLS // GAME AUDIO | BUILD


become more complex we see more and more entities in the game world vying for parts of the player’s ear, and Miles 10 was designed to provide more tools for controlling what gets heard.


How did you make sure the changes introduced are what’s needed by today’s game audio professionals? Was it a matter of working with long-standing developer partners, for example? One of the great things about working with RAD is I do the support as well as the development, so over time I generate a list of features that are desired but not yet implemented. Over the course of developing Miles 9, many features were desired that didn’t ‘slot in’ to the old Miles architecture, so a new version was required.


Famously, of course, Miles Sound System has been around since 1991; effectively the dawn of middleware. Is any of what defined Miles back then still key to the middleware today? I would say that RAD’s greatest strength is its support, and no matter what version Miles is on, that will remain a pillar. It’s hard to compare the Miles from pre-Pentium days to the software package it is today. Back then, CPU cycles and memory were both very precious, and sound card compatibility was critical. Nowadays it’s all about streamlining production and ensuring that all production personnel have no problems doing what needs to get done.


Moving into the detail, what are the most significant new features introduced to Miles Sound System 10?


Miles 10 has a huge list of upgrades – too many to list. The most important is a focus on buses, and providing tonnes of controls on routing audio. In Miles 10, each sample can have multiple outputs or ‘sends’, each of which can have their own sends, with filters allowed everywhere. Each of these buses is also responsible for voice management, providing tonnes of knobs to control how many things are audible at any given moment.


Project set-up has been streamlined,


and low-level code integration is straightforward. Dan Thompson, RAD Game Tools


So who is your core market, in terms of the types of studio you supports? Does Miles Sound System 10 offer much to smaller teams, or is it best suited to triple-A teams? Miles isn’t picky - it can handle any team.


And for a studio embracing Miles Sound System 10 for the first time, how do you think it will impact the working process? We are expecting it to be a fairly easy transition. Project set-up has been


streamlined, and for studios utilising the high level toolset, the low-level code integration is very straightforward. Getting started is more or less opening


Miles Studio and dragging in sound files, and iteration is simple since you can edit while the game is running.


What about old hands who’ve worked with Miles Sound System for years? How have you assured that the migration to the new release 10 will be as painless as possible for them? It’ll be a bit more work than what they are used to, however the old functions have analogous counterparts in the new API. Since Miles Sound System 10 is such a large upgrade in terms of functionality, we’ve taken the time to clean up the customer-facing functions. I think old hands will love how easy and intuitive the new API is for them.


And what would you say to anybody still unsure about fully embracing Miles Sound System 10?


Miles 10 has a lot of improvements. We encourage anyone who is on the fence about it to get an evaluation from us. Hands-on experience will trump an incomplete list on paper any day. 


Developers can arrange a free evaluation by contactingsales3@radgametools.com or calling +1 425 893 4300.


www.radgametools.com


The Miles Sound System 10 (below) features a huge list of upgrades with a focus on buses to provide a host of controls on routing audio


AUGUST 2014 | 67


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