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FALMOUTH UNIVERSITY | #DEVELOPJOBS


SKILLS AND TRAINING This month: Falmouth University


IN SEPTEMBER, FALMOUTH University is set to launch a new BA in Digital Games, designed to educate students to keep up with changes in the industry. The course will teach pupils the skills to work in roles including art, design, writing and sound design, and also equip them with the business skills to set up their own games development studio, should their ambitions set them down the independent route. The University is also home to the new £1.5m business incubation programme Alacrity, which only began in May and is targeted at the digital creative industries, including games. The programme is focused on entrepreneurship and instilling business knowledge into students. Though already launched, Falmouth aims to extend the programme in 2015 by accepting more students onto the course than the current 20 it has – whittled down from 70 applicants. As well as receiving an education in games business, the University is also looking at creating programmes in Renewable Energy and Aerospace, following the Alacrity model. “Focused on entrepreneurship, the programme drives innovation and IP, creating new high growth businesses in Cornwall that enhances the UK and Cornwall’s competitive


Falmouth University Penryn Campus, Treliever Road, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE


T: 01326 213730 E: penrynreception @fxplus.ac.uk W: www.falmouth.ac.uk


Dixon says that Falmouth University’s business-focused courses is helping to increase the employability of its students and grow the UK’s economy


Not every University


can say they are growing the UK economy. Nick Dixon, Falmouth


position as the producer and user of digital applications and creative content globally,” explains Falmouth University’s Alacrity project manager Nick Dixon.


Falmouth University’s Digital Games BA programme is running alongside a MA in Entrepreneurship DEVELOP-ONLINE.NET


“We do this by building demand-driven businesses using the proven Alacrity methodology for commercialising technology and creating entrepreneurs.” Dixon says the focus of the programme is on creating real projects. Students will undertake a Masters’ in Entrepreneurship that runs in parallel to the projects that graduates are undertaking, including games. The 20 students on the course are split into five teams tasked with developing a project, including making unique games, gamification for multi-nationals, and e-learning programmes. Such projects can also cover the use of motion capture and virtual reality technology. “These projects were assigned by real industry partners, including a high-profile console platform holder and a blue-chip organisation operating within the tech sector, who had identified a market-driven need,” says Dixon. “Experiential learning is central to the course, enabling students to learn through working on live projects such as these. “To guide students in their learning and develop their projects towards becoming full-fledged start-ups, students receive intensive coaching sessions and support too. Mentors and coaches are selected for their


business, academic and management acumen. Right now, students are conducting due diligence and evaluations on their projects. They will be choosing which project to take through to production with their business partner.” Dixon claims the business-focused programme enables graduates to go on and build their own companies, and increase the employability of pupils who are looking to join a firm that already exists.


“We are increasing employability, growing the UK economy and exploring brand new areas of creative innovation. Not every University can say that.”


INFO


Course: Alacrity programme, BA in Digital Games Established: 2014 Country: UK Staff: Nick Dixon (programme director, Alacrity Falmouth) Tanya Krzywinska


(professor of Digital Games) AUGUST 2014 | 53


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