This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
B A R B I C A N L I F E


An interview with Sarah Moore - food campaigner and chef


Sarah Moore is a familiar face to those who have enjoyed tasting her seductive soups, pestos and cakes. All produced in minutes from food that might have been thrown away by cooks less committed to the idea that eating well doesn’t need to cost the earth. Sarah has been weaving her magic with food that might not meet the supermarkets’ red, round and six to the pound criteria for years – and more recently has been teaching City residents how to as well.


Primrose curd ice cream with rhubarb


I


caught up with her after sampling her apple cake at the recent community festival to celebrate Apple Day to find out more about this pioneering food campaigner and


chef. Sarah told me that she has always


loved cooking. One of her earliest memories is making mudpies - a delicious concoction of earth garnished grass and daisies! This inspired the name of her food blog Mudpies and Minestrone- although the recipes now are a little more palatable. Sarah’s mother and grandmother


helped generate her love of cooking and sustained her through stints working in the macho environment of restaurant kitchens. But it was the discovery of Elizabeth David and then later Keith Floyd that set Sarah on the path of home cooking using the best of local and traditional ingredients.


Obviously it worked because a few


years later Sarah was running the catering for George Martin’s Air Studios in Hampstead. Producer of the Beatles and many of the great bands of


the 60s and 70s, Sir George (an early graduate of GSMD) continued to run the studios until 2006. Sarah had to cater for artists from the Three Tenors to Oasis and a range of culinary tastes


I asked Sarah how she got into


Chestnut and mushroom pudding with madiera


24


catering. “I was one of the Mums at a children’s birthday party. Someone asked whether anyone could recommend a caterer. “I’m a caterer” was out of my mouth before I could stop myself. Then of course I had really dropped myself in it – so I had to learn fast.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68